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Meaning of "2-pref" & "3-pref"?


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#1 Nooman Naqvi

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 11:55 PM

Where can I go to learn what does "2-perf" & "3-perf" (camera) mean?

I've also read that 3-perf cameras save 25% of film stock.

Edited by Nooman Naqvi, 01 December 2006 - 11:56 PM.

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#2 Mike Rizos

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 12:04 AM

http://en.wikipedia....gative_pulldown
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 12:55 AM

The standard 35mm frame usually is 4 sprocket holes tall (4-perf) -- most negative and all theatrical projection in 35mm is 4-perf. Some people shoot 3-perf 35mm, one sprocket hole less tall. This makes the natural 4x3 (1.33 : 1) shape of the 35mm negative less tall, a wider rectangle, more like 16x9 (1.77 : 1). This makes sense for material that will be transferred to 16x9 video, and for movies that might go through a D.I. (digital intermediate), which will allow them to output the final corrected image onto a 4-perf 35mm negative in a standard projection format. 3-perf is 25% less tall than 4-perf, thus a 25% savings on stock & processing.

2-perf 35mm dates back to the early 1960's as the Techniscope format; being half the height of 4-perf, the negative is naturally very widescreen (2.66 : 1 at its widest, since it is half as tall as a 4-perf 1.33 : 1 negative.) Usually 2-perf is framed for 2.35 : 1 (CinemaScope) and then blown-up to 4-perf 35mm anamorphic for scope projection. You would save 50% over 4-perf on stock & processing.

However, when shooting 2-perf or 3-perf, you have to figure in the cost of the blow-up to standard 4-perf for 35mm projection.
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#4 Nooman Naqvi

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 01:18 AM

Mike, Dave. Thank you for your help. Its clear to me now.
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#5 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 10:05 AM

The standard 35mm frame usually is 4 sprocket holes tall (4-perf) -- most negative and all theatrical projection in 35mm is 4-perf. Some people shoot 3-perf 35mm, one sprocket hole less tall. This makes the natural 4x3 (1.33 : 1) shape of the 35mm negative less tall, a wider rectangle, more like 16x9 (1.77 : 1). This makes sense for material that will be transferred to 16x9 video, and for movies that might go through a D.I. (digital intermediate), which will allow them to output the final corrected image onto a 4-perf 35mm negative in a standard projection format. 3-perf is 25% less tall than 4-perf, thus a 25% savings on stock & processing.

2-perf 35mm dates back to the early 1960's as the Techniscope format; being half the height of 4-perf, the negative is naturally very widescreen (2.66 : 1 at its widest, since it is half as tall as a 4-perf 1.33 : 1 negative.) Usually 2-perf is framed for 2.35 : 1 (CinemaScope) and then blown-up to 4-perf 35mm anamorphic for scope projection. You would save 50% over 4-perf on stock & processing.

However, when shooting 2-perf or 3-perf, you have to figure in the cost of the blow-up to standard 4-perf for 35mm projection.

"American Graffitti" is such a GREAT movie and was shot in Techniscope. Imagine that movie
was low budget and had to save money on film stock. Does anybody notice extra grain in it
from the blow-up?
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Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

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