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Color or B&W?


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#1 Brendan mk Uegama

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 02:31 PM

I'm shooting a short project soon on Super 16. Were making a film noir picture, but I'm deciding what to shoot for...Black and White or Colour. Of course the first thing to come to mind is shooting a film noir in B&W, but I recently watched Road to Perdition by Conrad Hall and that is beautiful film noir in colour.

Our film is going to be submitted to the festivals, and I'm not sure if shooting one over the other has any advantage. Would shooting in colour be any more attractive to them?

Plus, what are some of your favorite film noir pictures?
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#2 Chance Shirley

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 03:18 PM

I would recommend against B/W for a feature, as distributors don't seem to like it. For a festival short, I'd say black and white all the way. Real B/W looks great, and the stock costs are about half that of color film.

Happy shooting...
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#3 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 04:28 PM

A lot of productions nowadays shoot in color, but then switch the image to b&w in post, and it seems to work well in most cases.

I'd recommend you go for the Noir in color, and if you want to switch it over to b&w, it's still possible.
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#4 Andrew Koch

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 06:55 PM

If you want the old Black and White look, shoot on B&W Negative. Don't shoot color "just in case" because then the look will be a compromise either way. B&W negative looks different than color negative converted to B&W because B&W film does not have the Anti-Helation backing, meaning the the higlights bloom in funky ways that give it that distinct old school look. Black and White stocks are much cheaper, they are grainier, so if you don't want grain I would avoid the 7222 Double X. Shoot on the 7231 plus X and if you are doing a Telecine, try to do it on a spirit to cut down on the grain, because plus x is also fairly grainy.
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#5 Kim Sargenius

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Posted 26 December 2006 - 12:04 AM

Of course the first thing to come to mind is shooting a film noir in B&W, but I recently watched Road to Perdition by Conrad Hall and that is beautiful film noir in colour.


Also have a look at 'Klute', shot by Gordon Willis, ASC.


cheers,

Kim
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rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Glidecam