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#1 Tim Terner

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 06:12 AM

Looks like a poor mans steadicam http://services.manfrotto.com/figrig/ but just wondered if anyone here has used one and how usefull they might be
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 09:24 AM

Looks like a poor mans steadicam http://services.manfrotto.com/figrig/ but just wondered if anyone here has used one and how usefull they might be


Hi,

I played with one at IBC, if I owned a small camera I would get one.

Stephen
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#3 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 05:36 PM

Looks like a poor mans steadicam http://services.manfrotto.com/figrig/ but just wondered if anyone here has used one and how usefull they might be

It's just a handheld rig. It's no replacement for steadicam. There was a pretty long thread about it on the steadicam forum a year or two ago. There was some snickering involved.
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#4 Chris Durham

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 06:00 PM

I've got one complaint about my fig rig: When I'm trying to shoot non-narrative footage in a public environment I get tons of mouth-breathers making jokes as to where the rest of my car might be as though they might have been the first one clever enough to litter up my audio with that gem.

Fig Rig is alright. I use it with my XL2 and it's a little heavy - the XL being naturally front-heavy unless you use the wide angle lens, which I recommend for this. It's not a steady cam, though. It's good for handheld moving shots and walking shots as long as you can move steadily. I wouldn't count on using it for any really long takes.
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#5 James Erd

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 06:22 PM

The price seems a bit steep for something you can put together your self. The manfroto quick release is available separately. I don't remember what mine cost but it was less that $100. All you need after that is an old steering wheel.

There are other rigs you can build as well. Have you seen the $14 steady cam?

http://www.cs.cmu.ed...hnny/steadycam/

Ingenuity goes further than $$$ though I loved to have the bucks as well.
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#6 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 07:36 PM

There are other rigs you can build as well. Have you seen the $14 steady cam?

http://www.cs.cmu.ed...hnny/steadycam/

Ingenuity goes further than $$$ though I loved to have the bucks as well.

This is really just a handheld rig. There is nothing between your body and the camera to reduce vibration and unwanted motion. He's added a bit more mass, which will help a little. Also, can you imagine how heavy that thing gets? He's got weights on the bottom of it!
There are a lot of these cheap "steady cam's" out there, but remember, you get what you pay for.
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