Jump to content


Photo

Fuji Eterna 200T


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 13 December 2006 - 04:32 PM

A couple weeks ago I shot some film tests with Fuji's Eterna 200T 16mm stock. My idea for the shoot was to play around with PlusGreen gels and see how the film would react.

I have to say, I was actually impressed by how the shots turned out. I knew Fuji tends to bias towards the greens, even its blacks seems to have a little green in it. But if you play to the stock's strength by adding a green lighting element to your shot, I found it looked fantastic.

Not to mention I really liked the finer grain of the 200T as opposed to 500T. Just more evidence that different brands, stocks and ASA's all serve their own purpose.
  • 0

#2 Arni Heimir

Arni Heimir
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 326 posts
  • Other
  • Reykjavik/Barcelona

Posted 13 December 2006 - 07:22 PM

don't you mean 250t?
  • 0

#3 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 13 December 2006 - 08:22 PM

D'oh! Sorry, yeah, 250T

I did meter at 200 though, since I was using a Sekonic Analog meter and it's kinda tough to set it for 250 exactly. That that it would have made TOO much difference anyway.

Thanks for the correction :ph34r:
  • 0

#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 13 December 2006 - 08:54 PM

btw, I always feel like an ass whenever I reference my film stock wrong :/

(kicks self)

OK, I'm over it :)
  • 0

#5 Charles MacDonald

Charles MacDonald
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1157 posts
  • Other
  • Stittsville Ontario Canada

Posted 13 December 2006 - 09:46 PM

I did meter at 200 though, since I was using a Sekonic Analog meter and it's kinda tough to set it for 250 exactly. That that it would have made TOO much difference anyway.

200, 250, 320, 400. - 200 and 400 are marked, the other two are click stops.
  • 0

#6 Patrick Cooper

Patrick Cooper
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 908 posts
  • Other

Posted 13 December 2006 - 10:55 PM

I watched Fuji's demo DVD again last night and paid particular attention to the Eterna 250T and 250D film footage. I don't know whether it was my imagination or not but to me, the 250T shots tended to look slightly sharper than the 250D shots, particularly when mid shots of people were being filmed. I know this can't be right...surely my eyes must be playing tricks on me. For one thing, a daylight film should be finer grained than a tungsten film of the same speed theoretically, according to John Pytlak. Though I would assume that sharpness would be the same.

By the way, I was looking at that short film called 'Return of the Shadow' on the demo DVD. It was the segment showing a news reporter outdoors by the entrance of a grand building talking to a news camera man that I was scrutinizing. None of the shots in that particular segment looked impressively sharp too me. Unless some other factor was affecting sharpness. However, closeups tended to appear 'sharper' naturally.
  • 0


New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

CineLab

Glidecam

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

The Slider

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Visual Products