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Shooting with F900


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#1 Philip J. Martinez

Philip J. Martinez
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  • Steadicam Operator
  • New York, NY

Posted 13 December 2006 - 11:14 PM

Hello

I'd like to thank anyone in advance for any advice they could offer.

This is my 1st post on this forum.

I have been shooting in NYC for the past 10 years and have own an Aaton package for most of it.

I just shot a Music Video with the F900 (I have used it often on cooking shows) it was a green screen job that is having 3-D backgrounds made for it. I shot in 29.97 P instead of 23.98 P. I think this was the right choice, I got a call from the producer not saying that there was a problem but that they did not know how to load if for edit if it was not 24P. I told them it was a button in the computer.

Is there more of a differences in frame rate on HD then Film? I have shot green screen jobs on film that were 29.97 FPS and ones that were 24 FPS and I just had to let the transfer house know witch one. Is it not the same in HD???

Thanks again
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#2 David Cox

David Cox
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  • london, UK

Posted 14 December 2006 - 04:39 AM

You're right - its just a setting in the post software and they shouldn't have any problems thereafter.

Probably what is happening is that the director or producer has said its 24P and either their software is refusing to load it (cos its 29.97) or because they have loaded it in 24P and its going out of sync. This confusion often happens if the wrong information gets to the post house, and it isn't helped that many HD VTRs aren't that helpful at stating what the native frame rate is. Some VTRs are designed to playback at any frame rate irrelevant of the native recording - some even just make a tape look blank if the right frame rate isn't selected!

The best practise is for the camera assistant to clearly write the native frame rate on each tape. This is especially true for cameras such as the Varicam that can record many frame rates.

David Cox
Baraka Post Production
www.baraka.co.uk
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