Jump to content


Photo

Printing Up


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Ashim

Ashim
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 81 posts
  • Other

Posted 15 December 2006 - 12:00 AM

Hi,


I'd like to know what would be the effect of exposing the negative perfectly(18% gray) and then
printing it "up" during timing.


Thank You
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 20074 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 15 December 2006 - 12:14 AM

Hi,
I'd like to know what would be the effect of exposing the negative perfectly(18% gray) and then
printing it "up" during timing.
Thank You


Printing "up" means printing the image to look brighter. This means using lower printer light numbers. Depending on how low the numbers get, the image can start to have milkier blacks and more grain.
  • 0

#3 Ashim

Ashim
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 81 posts
  • Other

Posted 15 December 2006 - 12:42 AM

Printing "up" means printing the image to look brighter. This means using lower printer light numbers. Depending on how low the numbers get, the image can start to have milkier blacks and more grain.


Sir,

Assuming I have a perfectly exposed negative, which shld print in the 30-40 range, I print it up. I use the lower numbers 15-17-19. How can I get a Brighter image when I am pumping less light through the negative onto the print film.

Kindly clarify,
Thank You
  • 0

#4 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 20074 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 15 December 2006 - 12:55 AM

Sir,

Assuming I have a perfectly exposed negative, which shld print in the 30-40 range, I print it up. I use the lower numbers 15-17-19. How can I get a Brighter image when I am pumping less light through the negative onto the print film.

Kindly clarify,
Thank You


Because you have to think backwards when dealing with negative...

Print film is basically a negative film -- it's making a negative from a negative, which means it ends up as a positive image. And the more light you add to print film, the darker it gets. Ever expose a piece of b&w printing paper to light and develop it? It becomes darker.

The thinner (less exposed) a negative is, the easier it is for the printing light to pass through it, so you have to use lower numbers to compensate. The denser (more exposed) a negative is, the more light you have to pump through it.

So printing a negative to end up looking like a brighter positive image means using less light when printing.
  • 0


Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

The Slider

Technodolly

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products