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Shooting with vision 200t


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#1 chris buddy

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 11:24 PM

Some beginner help please...

I am about to shoot some tests with 200t. The conclusion I have drawn from this forum is that
my nizo s800 will not correctly read this ASA. If that is the case, once I have my meter reading,
do I compensate this by overexposing? Any thoughts on how many stops? Thank you and please
let me know if I am way off.
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#2 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 12:39 AM

Some beginner help please...

I am about to shoot some tests with 200t. The conclusion I have drawn from this forum is that
my nizo s800 will not correctly read this ASA. If that is the case, once I have my meter reading,
do I compensate this by overexposing? Any thoughts on how many stops? Thank you and please
let me know if I am way off.


I know I've explained this before but I wouldn't be able to tell which topic it was.

Basically, it's probably going to come out fine anyways because if it overexposes the negative by a stop, that is fine, even if it underexposes it by a half stop, you still will be fine.

The way to figure out how far off your reading is, is to use a film stock that you can trust. That used to be Kodachrome 40, but since you probably don't have that because the stock has been discontinued. I held on to a couple of K-40's specifically so I could always use it as a fallback. I don't know which stock to recommend to you that I can guarantee will read accurately because the Plus-X has also had an ASA rating change as well. (anyone have a suggestion?)

Compare the reading you get with the known cartridge versus the 200T, than you can calculate what the "offset" is.
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#3 Chris Burke

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 10:51 AM

I know I've explained this before but I wouldn't be able to tell which topic it was.

Basically, it's probably going to come out fine anyways because if it overexposes the negative by a stop, that is fine, even if it underexposes it by a half stop, you still will be fine.

The way to figure out how far off your reading is, is to use a film stock that you can trust. That used to be Kodachrome 40, but since you probably don't have that because the stock has been discontinued. I held on to a couple of K-40's specifically so I could always use it as a fallback. I don't know which stock to recommend to you that I can guarantee will read accurately because the Plus-X has also had an ASA rating change as well. (anyone have a suggestion?)

Compare the reading you get with the known cartridge versus the 200T, than you can calculate what the "offset" is.



Does the s800 have manual control over the ?-stop? If so, then use an external meter and all your worries will end. I prefer to use a Minolta Auto IV F. If you can not use a meter due to some uncontrollable factor, don't worry. The latitude of that stock is such that you will get a useable image if using the built in meter. But you really should go for the external meter.


chris
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#4 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 03:57 PM

Does the s800 have manual control over the ?-stop? If so, then use an external meter and all your worries will end. I prefer to use a Minolta Auto IV F. If you can not use a meter due to some uncontrollable factor, don't worry. The latitude of that stock is such that you will get a useable image if using the built in meter. But you really should go for the external meter.
chris


Since using an alternative cartidge as a reliable constant is no guarantee anymore, then going for the external meter makes a lot sense. However, if you go for an external meter, notate how far off your automatic camera meter is and if it's consistently off that same amount. As long as your camera meter is consistent, even if it's not accurate but always off the same amount, you can use it in emergency situations and then simply add or subtract the now known f-stop offset.

I like to zoom the lens in and take a reading at the brightest and the darkest part of the scene, then make my final f-stop judgement based on those two readings. But in your situation that won't help you until you know how far off your super-8 camera auto exposure meter is when compared to an external light meter.

You will probably have 1/2 stop of light loss because of the viewfinder so keep that in mind when using a light meter. 1/60th of second shutter speed is a "safe guess" if you are not sure what your shutter speed actually is.
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Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

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rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post