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#1 Jonathan Bryant

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 05:54 PM

What are some good powerful lights that are inexpensive and work on regular 20amp circuits? I am looking to light large 50ft by 50ft areas to f4 at 800asa. I am considering the Altman 2k Softlights or maybe the Barger Baglite that has 3 cords and can take 6 1000watt bulbs with a softbox attached creating a 6k softlight running off three 20amp circuits.

Edited by Jonathan Bryant, 16 December 2006 - 05:55 PM.

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#2 Frank Barrera

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 09:47 AM

What are some good powerful lights that are inexpensive and work on regular 20amp circuits? I am looking to light large 50ft by 50ft areas to f4 at 800asa. I am considering the Altman 2k Softlights or maybe the Barger Baglite that has 3 cords and can take 6 1000watt bulbs with a softbox attached creating a 6k softlight running off three 20amp circuits.



Are you planning on renting or buying? Is this an on going project or a one time thing? Regardless you will need about 9K of light to get your f4 @ a 60th sec for 800 asa rating. Do you plan on lighting all from the ground or from the grid as well? Those Barger lights should not be pointed directly down off a grid; as they have no rear ventilation and will get too hot. Space lights are the way to go from the cieling.

You could try building large (36" or 42") china balls with 500 watt bulbs. Again you would need about 9K so that would be 18 china balls.

The question is: If you need 9k of power you might save time and spend the same money by doing a tie-in and renting Space Lights.

Good Luck
f
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#3 Hal Smith

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 10:45 AM

I know I sound a bit like a broken record with this advice but: Can you get access to a range or dryer outlet at this location? Both are 208/240 volt circuits with 30-50 amps available per 120 volt leg. You can build a very simple distribution box out of Home Depot or Lowe's supplies for around $100-150 (add $200 or so if you have to have a gaffer or electrician put it together for you). That would give you 7 to 12 kW of location power leaving the regular outlets available for small kickers, etc.
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#4 Jonathan Bryant

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 10:57 PM

I can't access anything accept 110v 20amp circuits. Someone needs to build a box where you can take regular 110v 20amp circuits and combine them into say a 240v plug for large lights. It is not the most important shots for the project either. I plan on lighting from the ground on C stands. We would buy maybe a 1-2k solution but if we decided on an HMi or something more expensive we would rent. We will have access to a lift and a camera jib.

I might go for an low key look having the key light drop off and light the background with splashes of Fresnels. Thanks for the recommendations!
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#5 Thomas Burns

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 11:08 PM

I bellieve the new generation of Barger Baglites have better rear ventilation, though they still run pretty hot. I agree that it's not a good idea to point them straight down.

Barger also makes a "3K" baglite that runs off one 20amp circuit. It's worth mentioning that although the different models are generally referred to as "3K" and "6K", the globes are actually 650w FCM's. All in all a very good lamp if you need a large, soft source. Might also be worth mentioning in light of your previous post regarding sodium vapors that you're only gelling options with the Barger baglites is to gel the front of the Chimera.

Hope this helps.

Thomas Burns
Electrician/Novice DP
Los Angeles
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#6 Hal Smith

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 11:30 PM

I can't access anything accept 110v 20amp circuits. Someone needs to build a box where you can take regular 110v 20amp circuits and combine them into say a 240v plug for large lights.

It can be done but it's one of those things best left to top notch gaffers and electricians. One has to know how single and three phase circuitry works and how to find and id different sides of single phase 240/120 circuits and different phases in 208/240 three phase circuitry in a given location. I've done it but I've got many years of experience and even held a journeyman electrician's card two handfuls of years ago in Tennessee.
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#7 Paul Bruening

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 01:14 AM

Inverse square law is a bitch. The light has to come from somewhere. For that much light, you gotta have the juice. Sorry. You can't cheat the laws of physics very often. It would probably be cheaper to stand up more 1K lights and find outlets on separate circuits and extension cord them to your shot. Keep in mind that while the breaker may say 20 amps, the wall outlet will likely be rated at only 15 amps. A 2K light can often overload them. As well, which outlets are sharing each 20 amp breaker can be almost random. Circuit testing lights by the dozens can come in handy here.

If your emphasis is cheap lighting, I recommend stage cans. You can get them from theater lighting companies. They sell for under $45.00 a can and hold a 1K par bulb. I have 9 of them and love them. You can put the more expensive dichroic pars in them at 5200Kelvin or run the cheaper 3200Kelvin pars. The lamps come in various lensing.
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