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cleaning a lens


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#1 Travis Cline

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 02:43 AM

Does anyone know if there is a problem spraying panchro or a similar product directly on the lens? I find it easier and better to spray panchro directly to the front element and then wipe it clean, as opposed to spraying a lens tissue and cleaning the lense with that. I've heard people say it is bad for the lense to spray directly on the lense as the liquid may leak inside of the elements, but is that true or just good old fashioned talk?

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#2 Mike Panczenko

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 11:11 AM

Does anyone know if there is a problem spraying panchro or a similar product directly on the lens? I find it easier and better to spray panchro directly to the front element and then wipe it clean, as opposed to spraying a lens tissue and cleaning the lense with that. I've heard people say it is bad for the lense to spray directly on the lense as the liquid may leak inside of the elements, but is that true or just good old fashioned talk?

Travis


It can leak inside the lens, and lead to fungus growth over time and some nasty issues. It's best to spray it on a lens tissue, and start wiping from the center outward, so that by the time you reach the edges, there is less solution that can leak through. I have sprayed Panchro directly on a lens at times, but the best thing to do really is to spray it on the lens tissue. Once or twice won't destroy your lens, but I wouldn't make a habit out it it- better safe than sorry, you know?
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#3 Scott Weatherford

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 01:42 AM

and a less costly solution than Pancro is Nail Polish.. works pretty well, saves a few bucks. Of course, if youre not buying the stuff, why not go for the Pancro, eh?
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#4 Travis Cline

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Posted 20 December 2006 - 03:37 PM

Thanks for the replies, and that is what I had heard too that liquid can seep into the elements, but I wasn't sure if it was folklore or not. But, as you say, I try to be safe rather than sorry and spray it on the lense tissue first. Thanks all.

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#5 Chris Keth

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Posted 23 December 2006 - 12:19 AM

and a less costly solution than Pancro is Nail Polish.. works pretty well, saves a few bucks. Of course, if youre not buying the stuff, why not go for the Pancro, eh?



...you're kidding...right? Nail polish is a bad idea in close proximity to a lens let alone intentionally applied to one. Why would nail polish clean a lens anyway? It's essentially a laquer...
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#6 chuck colburn

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Posted 23 December 2006 - 01:21 AM

and a less costly solution than Pancro is Nail Polish.. works pretty well, saves a few bucks. Of course, if youre not buying the stuff, why not go for the Pancro, eh?


I'm sure you don't mean nail polish but nail polish remover which is basicaly acetone with oils in it. A bad thing even if it was reagent grade acetone it will streak up a storm. As the other posts said use a proper lens cleaning fluid on a lens tissue working your way from the center of the lens in a circular motion towards the edge. But first make sure there are no chunks of anything not even dust on the lens by blowing it off first. Use an ear syringe or an inert canned air and a lens brush to remove any foregin substances from the lens surface. Also be carefull of particles that can be lodged in the threaded portion of the front lens cell as they can be wiped onto the lens surface during the cleaning process possibly resulting in scratches. An most important no using your shirt tail for lens cleaning.

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#7 Simon Miya

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Posted 30 December 2006 - 10:27 PM

Hi Travis!

I think the most important thing is to not use too much juice in the first place. A little goes a long way. If there is enough there to possibly seep into the lens body, it's way too much. Using too much will often leave streaks as well.
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#8 Natalie Saito

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 07:18 PM

It can leak inside the lens, and lead to fungus growth over time and some nasty issues. It's best to spray it on a lens tissue, and start wiping from the center outward, so that by the time you reach the edges, there is less solution that can leak through. I have sprayed Panchro directly on a lens at times, but the best thing to do really is to spray it on the lens tissue. Once or twice won't destroy your lens, but I wouldn't make a habit out it it- better safe than sorry, you know?


hey thanks for the advice. what's the difference between the expensive stuff like Panchro and other cheaper brand like rosco?

Edited by NSaito, 10 January 2007 - 07:23 PM.

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