Jump to content


Photo

Werner's Resolution Issue


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 Paul Bruening

Paul Bruening

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2858 posts
  • Producer
  • Oxford, Mississippi

Posted 18 December 2006 - 11:07 AM

Hey Gang and Werner,

I've been thinking about your resolution questions. I think you won't get any concrete answers due to this fact: Both digital and optical paths change the data, whether analog/optical or analog/digital/analog, so many times that prediction becomes almost impossible. Only if you can state every step of the production from taking to release print, could you even have an approximate number on the final resolution. It was almost guessable back in the all optical days. These days, the DI part does so much to the data (algorithsms galore) that final output becomes almost incalculably complicated. Even more so in the analog/digital/analog jump points at the scanner and recorder. Each of those machines deliver different results based on design and year of manufacture. Then the software handling the data does it's peculiar things. As well, digital projection interprets the data even further.

I think this is why people tend to use rules of thumb and rough numbers when translating digital and analog equivalents.
  • 0

#2 David Venhaus

David Venhaus
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 129 posts
  • Other
  • Wiseburn, CA

Posted 20 December 2006 - 11:16 PM

Something interesting, that no ones else has mentioned is that, apparent grain in film emulsions does not actually exist. It is a perceived phenomenon. Below is a electron micrograph of a developed silver in a film emulsion. A perceived "grain" particle is the eye and brain attempting to recognize a pattern between the light and dark areas in the film but an actual dot of silver does no exist. This is where that so-called "film look" comes in, it is in part of this granular pattern optical phenomenon that the eyes sees and reconstructs in the brain to see dot where there are none. Whereas a pixel (in the digital sense) is a square dot not comprised of any more fundamental structure. If a person wanted to digitally scan ALL the information in a silver based film negative, you would need an electron microscope.


figure15e.jpeg

Edited by David A Venhaus, 20 December 2006 - 11:17 PM.

  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

CineLab

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Opal

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

CineLab

CineTape

Tai Audio