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syncing and editing sound


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#1 Oscar Godfrey

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 06:51 PM

Hello,
When finding the sounds to be synced up to the image on magnetic tape i run the tape very slowly until i find the sound of the clapper board or some point of reference to sync to the image.
I just have a small question which is, where exactly on the playhead is the sound picked up, so i know exactly where to mark the tape. Is it right in the center of the playhead?
Thank you.
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#2 stephen defilippi

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 07:24 PM

Hello,
When finding the sounds to be synced up to the image on magnetic tape i run the tape very slowly until i find the sound of the clapper board or some point of reference to sync to the image.
I just have a small question which is, where exactly on the playhead is the sound picked up, so i know exactly where to mark the tape. Is it right in the center of the playhead?
Thank you.




Hi, i'm new at this, but i just did a sound course. I think the answer depends on which kind of machine you use. Some analogue machines have recording, erasing and play heads. Your instruction manual should identify that for you. Cheers
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#3 Oscar Godfrey

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 07:59 PM

Hi, i'm new at this, but i just did a sound course. I think the answer depends on which kind of machine you use. Some analogue machines have recording, erasing and play heads. Your instruction manual should identify that for you. Cheers


oh yes, i know which is the play head. I meant where abouts exactly on the head as the head is about 1cm in width.
Thanks
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#4 Hal Smith

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 09:24 PM

If you look at a tape head carefully you'll notice one or two small metal rectangles in the center located in larger, wider rectangular areas (often with rounded corners) of the tape side of the head. The active part of the play head is the small metal rectangle. The play head gap, where the recording is actually sensed is a vertical line in the center of the rectangle. If you take a loupe and look at the head you can usually see the fine, hairline gap. In almost every tape recorder in existence the last head the tape passes over is the play head no matter how many other heads the recorder may have. A mono recorder has only one of the small rectangles, two track (and four track stereo) machines have two such areas stacked vertically, and even more in a multi-channel professional machine.

One partial exception to the last head rule is some of the professional recorders that were built with both two track and four track stereo playback capability. I doubt if you've got one of those, but if you do, PM me and I'll find out which head is which. The most common 2/4 track stereo recorder was an option on the Otari 5050's.

Attached is a photo of a Technics head nest. The head on the left is a pretty standard looking four track stereo play head. If it was a two track head the two sections would be about twice as tall and closer together.
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#5 James Erd

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 09:32 PM

oh yes, i know which is the play head. I meant where abouts exactly on the head as the head is about 1cm in width.
Thanks


Just a thought. Try recording a test tone, then splice a very short section of it between two lengths of leader. Run it back and forth by hand past the play head. You'll be able to see the splice run by the head and hear when it makes a sound. It's a bit empirical I admit. My guess is that you will find the spot is rite in the middle of the head. If I'm wrong please accept my apology.
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#6 Oscar Godfrey

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Posted 20 December 2006 - 09:35 AM

thanks a lot guys.
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