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How do I achieve this look...


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#1 Jean-Francois Morin

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Posted 21 December 2006 - 04:10 AM

pics_63.jpg Hi folks, I am student in filmmaking and I am trying to achieve a certain look for my film... In still photography and with the help of program like photoshop, It wasn't difficult to get the approximative look that I was looking for, but how can I reach this in film... Is it all a matter of postprod. and DI process, or if we can get a similar look with filters... I don't know that much about DI, and compositing... have you any advice ? I don't have alot of money, so I cannot count on any lab or technician to doing this for me... By the way, I am shooting on Super 16mm film stock...

tks...
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#2 Trevor Greenfield

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Posted 21 December 2006 - 04:48 AM

compositing? am I missing something? That looks to me like 250D on an overcast day but maybe Im missing something.
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#3 Jean-Francois Morin

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Posted 21 December 2006 - 05:03 AM

compositing? am I missing something? That looks to me like 250D on an overcast day but maybe Im missing something.


lol.... I know that it is quite subtle, but I did use many coloration layer to get that soft green, and desaturated look.... I don't think that shooting straight with 250D will give that color effect... it will probably be more cold and blueish, which is what I want to avoid, especially in winter.... If there is no usefull filter, I think that I will probably use After effect to achieve it... It musn't be hard to learn after all.... :blink:
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#4 Oron Cohen

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Posted 21 December 2006 - 05:10 AM

I think this "look" is mostly achieved by the lens, lighting and composition you chose.
After all that I think that in a normal telecine suit you can do some color correction maybe add a little green and make it look a little under expose, also from the picture it's seem that you don?t want grain so: shoot with a slow stock, expose normally and then do some color and exposure correction in telecine.
One more thing you can do is to take this picture to the telecine guy, he can look and try to much color and exposure to the picture.
But mainly I think this look is achieved by what I wrote in the beginning of my post.
Good luck.
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#5 Christophe Collette

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Posted 21 December 2006 - 06:07 AM

Salut Jean-François, I don't think it is very hard to get that look though telecine, to me it looks just like plain desaturation + adding a bit of green to your image plus darkening the blacks. I'd probably shoot with a Nd horizontal Soft Grad to make sure you pick up enough sky so that when you boost up the contrast, it doesn't wash away... I shoot part of a short film exactly where you took this photo. Incinérateur Des Carrières...
Funny... Une photo référence d'une shot d'en dessous.


Christophe
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#6 Sergi Vilanova

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Posted 21 December 2006 - 07:50 AM

pics_63.jpg Hi folks, I am student in filmmaking and I am trying to achieve a certain look for my film... In still photography and with the help of program like photoshop, It wasn't difficult to get the approximative look that I was looking for, but how can I reach this in film... Is it all a matter of postprod. and DI process, or if we can get a similar look with filters... I don't know that much about DI, and compositing... have you any advice ? I don't have alot of money, so I cannot count on any lab or technician to doing this for me... By the way, I am shooting on Super 16mm film stock...

tks...



Hello Jean- François.

In my opinion, it shouldn't be difficult for you to achieve that look. It is quite simple and it is not at all a matter of DI or any special laboratory process.

it's just a matter of exposing, may be add a Polarizer filter (there is not much to polarize in that picture but it will help for sure) and do a proper telecine which, in a more complex and detailed way is not much different than a photoshop work (in terms of concept).

The only thing is that you should really get an overcast day when you shoot it. THAT's, to me, what you really need to achieve this particular look.

What I would do is: I'd put Fuji 250D in camera (Fuji has, to me a slightly greensih- cyan byass that would suit your purposes) but then I'd over expose the negative by to stops so you have those rich blacks and also to tighten the grain (which in Fuji is more noticeable, specially in 16mm.).

The rest is a matter of telecine (desaturate, darken a bit, add some contrast, etc.)
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#7 Christophe Collette

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Posted 21 December 2006 - 12:07 PM

I really have to disagree with you on this Sergi. In my humble opinion, overexposing two stops is overexposing a lot... I'd expose normally and do the rest in Telecine.

C
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#8 Sergi Vilanova

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Posted 21 December 2006 - 12:16 PM

I really have to disagree with you on this Sergi. In my humble opinion, overexposing two stops is overexposing a lot... I'd expose normally and do the rest in Telecine.

C



You are ABSOLUTAELY right Cristophe!!!
I ment 2 THIRDS of a stop. By that, correcting down that slight extra information, you help building up contrast and have richer blacks, which is basiclly what you have in the reference picture.

Sorry about the mistake

sergi
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#9 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 21 December 2006 - 12:41 PM

Jean,

You probably could achieve that look by using a slew of filters, but it can also be done in color correction with the most basic 3-way tools in Final Cut or whatever editing software you're using.

I think you should shoot it, maybe with a polarizer, maybe 1/2 stop over-exposed but brought back to normal in telecine. That way you'll be recording more information onto your negative and you'll have more latitude to work with when you do your color correction work. Although, since you'll be taking away or desaturating the color, it won't matter AS much. Still, it's always best to get as much image information as possible to work with.

cheers
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