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Optimizing HDV for corporate program


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#1 Jay Cavallaro

Jay Cavallaro

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Posted 24 December 2006 - 03:26 PM

Hello All,

This is my first post to the forum.

I am shooting a corporate program on the new Sony HVR-V1U 24p HDV Camera. In the past when I've worked with this client I've shot on a Betacam BVW D600. The programs have been a combination of well lit sit down interviews with primarily run & gun B-roll, basically 60 minutes- magazine style minus a host.

The style of this program is quite different in that there are no sit downs and were striving toward a more cinematic look and feel. The program is about the evolution of different products and the relationships between the individuals who develop them. I'll be shooting HDV 24p- 16:9 of course. The talent will be the actual employees of the company. They'll be wired for sound as they discuss with each other the history, obstacles and the eventual successes of the products. A few of the scenes will be based around as many as 5-7 people.

There are critical time restraints durring the shooting and we basically will get 1 take, 2 takes occasionally and 3 almost never within an extremely tight time frame. Our acces to spaces before hand for set-up is also quite limited.

My qyestion is with these limitations how do I best A. get enough light B. balance color temperature (most shots are indoors but there are lots of big windows) C. keep shots consistant from shot to shot and D. use camera techniques to give it a more cinematic feel.

I've been considering using primarily a china ball but that has it's obstacles.

Any feed back would be very much appreciated. Thanks much.

Jay Cavallaro
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 December 2006 - 08:02 PM

An HMI Joker in a Chimera "china ball" would give you a daylight-balanced Chinese Lantern effect. Or you could bounce a small HMI off of the ceiling or a white wall or card.

A 4' 4-bank Kino is useful because you can switch the tubes to daylight or tungsten.

If the shots are tight, you could put ND gel on the window just in the frame if too bright, or stretch a double-net on an 8'x8' frame or something to darken the background (you'd have to use a longer lens and keep the depth of field more shallow so that the net would be out-of-focus.) Otherwise, if a window is too bright to balance to, don't shoot in that direction or close down the blinds.
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