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Some questions regarding 16mm...


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#1 Dory Breaux DP

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Posted 26 December 2006 - 01:14 AM

Hey...
I would have posted that in the 16mm forum, but this is more specific to the stock, so...

Anywhoo. We shoot ski and snowboarding, and I'd like to know how well the KODAK VISION2 50D 7201 would work for this application. I can get the short ends for $0.19 a foot. What are short ends exactly? would it be more worth it to get the same stock but in the 100 foot rolls?


Thanks,
Dory
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 December 2006 - 01:30 AM

A short end is what's leftover when you don't use up an entire roll of film and sell the remainder. So it comes from an opened can of film that was loaded into a camera and then unloaded again. Since a 100' daylight spool of 16mm is barely 3 minutes of film, no one would short-end a 100' roll and sell the remainder, like 20' -- it would be considered waste. So most short ends come from the standard 400' roll (on cores) or maybe the large 800' rolls. If you need some 100' daylight spools of stock, you'd probably have to buy that new.

Slightly more trustworthy is what is called "buy-back" film, which was film that was purchased but never used and then sold.

But most short ends are snip-tested, so they are fairly reliable although they may be at the tail end of acceptable in terms of fog levels from aging (there's no hard line where a roll of film suddenly is too old to use; it just gets gradually worse in terms of fogging, loss of sensitivity, etc. so it's a matter of what level would be considered acceptable.)

7201 (50D) is a great slow-speed stock for shooting in daylight outdoors, and would also probably handle any aging better than a high-speed film. If you are planning a lot of slow-motion shooting or low-light shooting into dusk, you may want a few rolls of a faster stock like 7205 (250D).
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#3 Paul Bruening

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 04:49 PM

On the DVD commentary of Swingers Favreau talks about scrounging short ends to keep the shoot going. Apparently, they bought alot off of Twister. If you buy from a production in progress, you at least know where it came from and under what conditions it was loaded and recanned under. On the other hand, resellers like DR Group will test the ends like David said. Either way, there is some small percent of risk. Most folks have gotten dependable results when the stock was bought from a reputable seller or production. Only occaisionally do you hear about a shortends nightmare. If you are going to shoot something really important and there's just no way to get it in retakes you should probably shoot buy-backs or new stock. If the production day is inherently expensive (lots of extras, big name day player, special effects, expensive cranes and mo-co, etc.) then shoot buy-back or new.
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