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#1 J. Scott Portingale

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 05:51 PM

Is there a website that compares the unique look each different stock has to offer? MAybe with comparison sample stills of what the film looks like after proccessing? If so could someone send me a link. Thanks.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 06:47 PM

Don't cross-post.
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#3 J. Scott Portingale

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Posted 31 December 2006 - 12:28 PM

I don't want to sound like a newbe, but i kind of am. What does cross post mean? Is it like cross processing? I am shooting my next film on super 16mm with an arri SR3 most likely and am curious on what stock to shoot with. Half of the film is going to be in black and white, and the other half in colour. I have never shot colour motion film, and don't have a clue what stock to choose. Most of the colour film will be shot outside, but there will be some interiors as well. I want to shoot the interiors with low light to increase my depth of field. Is there a website that can further my education on shooting motion film? Or a book perhaps?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 December 2006 - 12:45 PM

Cross-posting is when you post the same question on multiple subforums, which has the unfortunate effect of breaking up a discussion into pieces unless everyone gets the idea to only answer one of your multiple posts and ignore the rest.

How many color stocks do you want to deal with? In theory, you could just get the fastest stock, 500T, for the low-light work, and use an 85ND filter for the day scenes, but then you'd have the grain of a 500 ASA stock in your day scenes when you probably had enough light to use a slower-speed (and thus less grainy) stock.

And if you want to use two stocks, 500T for the low-light stuff and then a slower-speed stock outdoors in order to get less grain, do you want to use a daylight-balanced stock (50D or 250D) or a tunsgten-balanced stock (100T or 200T) plus an 85B filter? (You will need some ND filters either way -- 85ND combos for the tungsten stock, straight ND's for the daylight stock.)

The advantage of a tungsten stock for the day work is mainly that: (1) if you order too much, you could use it for a tungsten-lit interior scene assuming you can get the light levels high enough for the slow speed; (2) you can pull the 85B filter for a very blue-ish look in daylight.

The advantage of a daylight-balanced stock is that you won't have to look through an orange correction filter in the viewfinder (the 85B) and it will have a slower blue record and thus less grain in the blues (like skies). And if you need the speed of 250D (250 ASA) you will get less grain than using 500T stock with an 85B (which makes it 320 ASA effectively) and more speed than 200T with an 85B (which makes it 125 ASA effectively.)

The stocks all look similar these days so I wouldn't sweat too much over 100T versus 200T, or 100T with an 85B filter (effective 64 ASA) versus 50D. At this stage of your career, keep it simple and you'll learn more as you work with these stocks.

Take your light meter around with you so you can learn what sort of light levels to expect for different ASA stocks. You may think that 50D will be fast enough because you'll be outside in sunlight, but you may find that in overcast weather under a canopy of trees, you need 250D stock.
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#5 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 31 December 2006 - 11:12 PM

"I want to shoot the interiors with low light to increase my depth of field."

Unfortunately, shooting in low light interiors will not increase your depth of field. Rather, you will get a significant reduction in depth of field compared to a brightly lit exterior location.
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#6 J. Scott Portingale

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Posted 01 January 2007 - 07:19 PM

Thanks for the tips David. I have read about this in books, but now it is starting to stick. Can't wait to shoot colour.

Edited by J. Scott Portingale, 01 January 2007 - 07:20 PM.

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