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the right film


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#1 Jim Hoene

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Posted 30 December 2006 - 06:32 PM

How Can I look up which film is right for my camera?
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#2 Matthew Buick

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Posted 30 December 2006 - 07:38 PM

If it's manual exposure then anything will do, however if it's auto exposure then you'l probably have to make do with 25, 40, 100, 160.
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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 30 December 2006 - 08:22 PM

DAYLIGHT : 25, 100.
TUNGSTEN: 40, 160.

Sorry, should have been more consise.
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#4 Jim Hoene

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Posted 30 December 2006 - 09:07 PM

Well I went to Kodak's site and found these films available for Super8:

Ektachrome 64T
Kodak Vision2 500T color negative film 7218
Kodak Vision2 200T color negative film 7217

and for b&w:

Plus-X Reversal Film 7265
Tri-X Reversal Film 7266

Can these be used in any Super 8?
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#5 Matthew Buick

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Posted 31 December 2006 - 10:31 AM

Those would have to be exposed in a camera with manual exposure, the Plus-X may be okay, though.
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#6 Matthew Buick

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 08:00 PM

What camera(s) do you have?
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#7 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 08:17 PM

If your using Canon 814 (other post) then any film available will expose fine. If your projecting and splicing, use reversal. If your getting a pro transfer and editing in NLE, use negative.
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#8 Jim Hoene

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 01:31 PM

What camera(s) do you have?


Right now a Bell & Howell 1222 soundstar but then I'm considering a Canon 814Xl-S

If your using Canon 814 (other post) then any film available will expose fine. If your projecting and splicing, use reversal. If your getting a pro transfer and editing in NLE, use negative.


Are you talking about transfering by telecine to a digital media for editing purpose when you suggest using negative? Which method of editing is best? Do you lose some of that film look when transfering to digital?
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 02:26 PM

Do you lose some of that film look when transfering to digital?


All film gets transferred to video (usually digital video) if you want to watch it on video, so I'm not sure what the question is. You don't have a choice if you want to show it on a TV monitor.
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#10 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 02:51 PM

Are you talking about transfering by telecine to a digital media for editing purpose when you suggest using negative? Which method of editing is best? Do you lose some of that film look when transfering to digital?

Negative is designed for digital transfer, or printing... and you don't lose the film look. Like David said, anything you see on TV that was shot on film goes through this process. Reversal is meant for direct projection of the camera original. You can have reversal transferred to digital, but you pick up contrast... and won't see into the highlights and shadows like negative film.
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#11 Matthew Buick

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 03:29 PM

Do you lose some of that film look when transfering to digital?


Telecined film does take on some video characteristics, these mutations are what's known as 'the film look'.
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#12 Jim Hoene

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 09:30 PM

Negative is designed for digital transfer, or printing... and you don't lose the film look. Like David said, anything you see on TV that was shot on film goes through this process. Reversal is meant for direct projection of the camera original. You can have reversal transferred to digital, but you pick up contrast... and won't see into the highlights and shadows like negative film.


First thanks to all. What is reversal used for? Also, and this may be off topic but can Super8 be cropped into a 1.85:1? If so are there any rules for framing your shots to make the best of it? Thanks again.
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The Slider

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