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Nostalgic Warm/Magenta Cast


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#1 Paul Swann

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 04:00 PM

Pre-production has just begun on a low budget feature film I'm shooting in February. I'm shooting on S16mm for 35mm blow up (on Fuji eterna stocks 8663/8673). For a number of flashback scenes the director requires a nostalgic look (1980's) and has provided a photograph for visual reference (the scenes are a mixture of day exteriors and day/night interiors). The photograph has a distinct warm/magenta cast caused by it's ageing process and I want some advice on how best to achieve a similar look for the film. I want to maintain normal contast levels so my thoughts are to add the warm/magenta wash/cast in post during grading (conventional/optical blow-up) and print on a higher contrast print stock. I have attached the photograph for reference and as this film is my first feature I'm a relative novice and welcome any advice.

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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 04:28 PM

I want to maintain normal contast levels so my thoughts are to add the warm/magenta wash/cast in post during grading (conventional/optical blow-up) and print on a higher contrast print stock.


Part of the look is the lifted blacks and general lowered contrast, so printing on a higher contrast stock may just work against you. To me, it looks like a magenta filter, combined with flashing would get you the desired look.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 05:53 PM

Part of the look is the lifted blacks and general lowered contrast, so printing on a higher contrast stock may just work against you. To me, it looks like a magenta filter, combined with flashing would get you the desired look.


Yes, you'd want a faded look, lifted blacks, plus a magenta bias to everything. Of course, this is the look of a red-shifted print where the yellow and cyan dyes have faded more than the magenta ones -- not the look of a faded negative that has been reprinted.

A print with deep blacks and a magenta tint wouldn't look like an old print.

If you are doing the blow-up to 35mm using an optical printer, the effect for those flashbacks may have to be built more into the original photography if everything is going to be blown-up and printed together, past and present scenes. You can't vary the print stock according to a scene, only to an entire reel, but you can print some scenes more magenta than others.

Of course, you could treat the flashbacks separately in a separate blow-up and cut them into a 35mm IN.

And if you are doing a D.I. for the conversion to 35mm, then you can do whatever you want to individual shots in post. But the final film-out would still have to be printed on one print stock type per reel.

I'd either flash the negative for the flashbacks or use an UltraCon filter or something to lift the blacks, maybe combined with a low-con stock like Fuji Eterna 400T.
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#4 Jaan Shenberger

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 06:18 PM

dunno if it's an option, but emulating an aged color shift look in DI is a very simple process (a truncating of individual RGB/CMY levels). you could even give the colorist an example like the one you've shown and he/she can recreate (pretty much exactly) the color shift.

also, it's important to note that most aged color shifted prints do not have "pure" whites... usually they have a subtle red-yellow tint. recreating this photochemically is going to be very difficult, if not impossible, if shooting on negative. it will be possible to "tint the whites" by shooting reversal (thus clipping your whites) and then adding the color when creating a neg, as done by lance accord for "buffalo 66". hope this helps.
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#5 Jaan Shenberger

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 06:29 PM

or i guess you could shoot neg, make a print (thus clipping your whites) and go on from there.
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