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Eclair NPR Tripod


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#1 JP Creatives

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 10:23 AM

Hello,

I have an Eclair NPR set-up with a heavy zoom that makes the whole thing weigh about 30 lbs.

I have been looking around for a tri-pod and the magic number appears to be 22 lbs max capacity for everything affordable.

Everything that has a higher capacity or one that fits my set-up costs thousands. What I have noticed is that most legs can handle a lot of weight, but the heads are the deciding factor, and most of them are 22 lbs or less.

Do you think that the max capacity must be acknowledged and followed religiously or can I get a 22 lb tripod set-up and use it with my package without any risk?

I don't see how a tripod head could be affected by 10 extra pounds considering they are usually large chunks of metal. If anyone has any advice or insight it would be great.

I cannot afford a cine tripod. So I am looking for alternate routes. Any reccomendations about where I could buy an old tripod that could hold the weight for considerably less money is also valuable.

Thanks in advance,

Jon
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#2 chuck colburn

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 10:35 AM

Hello,

I have an Eclair NPR set-up with a heavy zoom that makes the whole thing weigh about 30 lbs.

I have been looking around for a tri-pod and the magic number appears to be 22 lbs max capacity for everything affordable.

Everything that has a higher capacity or one that fits my set-up costs thousands. What I have noticed is that most legs can handle a lot of weight, but the heads are the deciding factor, and most of them are 22 lbs or less.

Do you think that the max capacity must be acknowledged and followed religiously or can I get a 22 lb tripod set-up and use it with my package without any risk?

I don't see how a tripod head could be affected by 10 extra pounds considering they are usually large chunks of metal. If anyone has any advice or insight it would be great.

I cannot afford a cine tripod. So I am looking for alternate routes. Any reccomendations about where I could buy an old tripod that could hold the weight for considerably less money is also valuable.

Thanks in advance,

Jon


Jon,

You say that you can't afford a cine tripod. Does that mean you do not plan on doing any tilting or paning with your camera?
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#3 Alain LeTourneau

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 02:29 PM

Jon,

Look into an O'Connor 50 set-up.


-Alain
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#4 Michael Collier

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 03:22 PM

Vinten also makes a head (forgot the model) that allows for changable springs. The problem with putting a 30lb camera on a 22lb head is not that it will fall apart, but that you would strip the locks quicker, and the counterballance/spring system would not be adequate, making accurate tilts difficult. Its also not only the weight, but how its positioned over the head. I don't have experience with the NPR, but if memory serves, the mag is towards the back, which helps. If you have a lot of weight high in the air, counterballancing becomes difficult (such as top-mounted mags)

Is there anyway to reduce the weight of the camera? can a battery be moved so its not resting its weight on the head? Or is the zoom whats tipping the scale?

Get the highest quality head you can, its lame to miss a shot because your tripod is dorking out. Cheap legs are easier to deal with that a cheap head. I have seen brand new (cheap) tripods begin to show problems within weeks of first use, and they need constant repair. So don't go too cheap.
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#5 Mitch Gross

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 11:36 PM

How is it that you have an NPR setup that tips the scales at 30ibs? Are you putting some huge 35 format zoom on there? If so, you should know that it is all too easy to strip the mount and turret on the camera, essentially destroying it. You better prepare to have someone machine a support plate of some kind to take the weight off the lens mount.

If this is not the case, than I can only assume you're including the battery weight, as IIRC, the NPR with a Perfectone motor, motor cradle, 400' of film and mag only weighs about 19ibs. Do you have a rig that mounts a battery to the camera? Don't stick one to the mag as the clamp from mag to camera body can't handle the additional stress. It might not pull the mag off, but it might pull the gate pads out of registration, giving you out of focus images. If you have an ourboard battery such as a gel cell, you could easily get a small pouch with a strap that you could hang from the tripod leg. That will remove a good deal of weight.

Otherwise, best heft at your price range is indeed an old O'Connor 50. State of the art 1965, but then again so is the NPR.
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#6 JP Creatives

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 04:01 PM

How is it that you have an NPR setup that tips the scales at 30ibs? Are you putting some huge 35 format zoom on there? If so, you should know that it is all too easy to strip the mount and turret on the camera, essentially destroying it. You better prepare to have someone machine a support plate of some kind to take the weight off the lens mount.

If this is not the case, than I can only assume you're including the battery weight, as IIRC, the NPR with a Perfectone motor, motor cradle, 400' of film and mag only weighs about 19ibs. Do you have a rig that mounts a battery to the camera? Don't stick one to the mag as the clamp from mag to camera body can't handle the additional stress. It might not pull the mag off, but it might pull the gate pads out of registration, giving you out of focus images. If you have an ourboard battery such as a gel cell, you could easily get a small pouch with a strap that you could hang from the tripod leg. That will remove a good deal of weight.

Otherwise, best heft at your price range is indeed an old O'Connor 50. State of the art 1965, but then again so is the NPR.


Going with an O'Connor 50. Sate of the art 1965 seems to me to be great! The NPR is an incredible camera, especially converted to super 16mm. My lens is a big heavy 35mm zoom, but I have decided to go without support, and just mount it on there with a PL to C-mount converter. 10 lbs. is not too much for a c-mount!

Just kidding!

Of course I have support, and it's a bayonet mount.

Thanks to everyone for their responses,

Jon
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