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Canon scoopic Question


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#1 Easton Sheahan-Lee

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 08:24 PM

I just have a few other questions regarding the Scoopic.

First off, does it require a take-up spool or does it have some sort of other mechanism?

Secondly, how complicated is the loading procedure? Is it easy enough to experiment with, with a roll of dud film?

LAstly, since it is non-reflex, does the view-finder show the effects of zooming in and out on the object (I know it seems sorta stupid but......)?
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#2 Sir Alvin Ekarma

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 08:34 PM

First off, does it require a take-up spool or does it have some sort of other mechanism?

It requires a 100' take up spool. You can probably drop by whatever lab you'll have the processing done at and get a bunch of emptys for free if it already doesn't have one left by the last person who used it.

Secondly, how complicated is the loading procedure? Is it easy enough to experiment with, with a roll of dud film?


I've found it easier to load than a bolex. Just snip off the end using the film cutter inside the camera, run the camera (remember not to load with the camera set over 24 fps, but you can use a slower speed to be safe) and stick the film into the guides. The camera is loaded in five seconds and you could even do this in a changing bag.

LAstly, since it is non-reflex, does the view-finder show the effects of zooming in and out on the object (I know it seems sorta stupid but......)?


It's a relfex camera. No worries.

Edited by Sir Alvin Ecarma, 04 January 2007 - 08:35 PM.

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#3 Easton Sheahan-Lee

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 08:36 PM

Ahhhh, okay thanks!

So for a take-up spool, did there used to be one standard that came with the camera? because I am buying a Canon Scoopic 16 for something around 100$ from a guy I know, and it includes all the original parts......or is it just something you can get anywhere?

When you mean cut off the end, you mean the leader bit right?

Edited by Easton Sheahan-Lee, 04 January 2007 - 08:37 PM.

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#4 Sir Alvin Ekarma

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 08:42 PM

So for a take-up spool, did there used to be one standard that came with the camera?


It's standard in that it's usually a 100ft daylight loading spool and those are a dime a dozen. Like I said, you could just go to the lab and ask for a bunch if there isn't one w/ the camera already plus you'll probably need a couple of extras.

When you mean cut off the end, you mean the leader bit right?


Yeah. You may want to go to Ebay and get an instruction manual. That should answer any and all questions you might/will have.

Good luck!

Edited by Sir Alvin Ecarma, 04 January 2007 - 08:44 PM.

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#5 Easton Sheahan-Lee

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 08:47 PM

It's standard in that it's usually a 100ft daylight loading spool and those are a dime a dozen. Like I said, you could just go to the lab and ask for a bunch if there isn't one w/ the camera already plus you'll probably need a couple of extras.
Yeah. You may want to go to Ebay and get an instruction manual. That should answer any and all questions you might/will have.

Good luck!


Well I have worked with 16mm Before but I have always had people on hand to load the camera (a friend of mine is in his 3rd year at film school).

The leader bit will be marked I assume?
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#6 Sir Alvin Ekarma

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 09:01 PM

The leader bit will be marked I assume?


Strictly speaking, it's just the five feet of film at the head of a roll on top of the 100ft already there. Again, the manual should clarify all of this for you.

Edited by Sir Alvin Ecarma, 04 January 2007 - 09:02 PM.

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#7 Easton Sheahan-Lee

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 10:43 PM

Strictly speaking, it's just the five feet of film at the head of a roll on top of the 100ft already there. Again, the manual should clarify all of this for you.



Okay, thanks again. Just curious though, why is it necescary to cut this bit off? if it is an extra 5 feet great! or is it marked at a certain point. Why do manufacturers include this?
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#8 Sir Alvin Ekarma

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 10:48 PM

Okay, thanks again. Just curious though, why is it necescary to cut this bit off? if it is an extra 5 feet great! or is it marked at a certain point. Why do manufacturers include this?


Any amount of film that you use to load it is going to get fogged so the five feet is expendable. There's another extra five feet at the end for unloading but you may just want to take it out in a changing bag if it's something vital. Just remember to mark the film case as "Critical End" and the lab will know what to do.
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#9 Easton Sheahan-Lee

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 11:30 PM

Do you have to cut the first bit off?

Like it comes with an extra 9ft I understand that, but at what point do you cut the piece off? because in the K3 it seems that the cutting tool is before the film guide etc. Can you leave the extra length on just for loading purposes or does that mess up your camera?
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#10 Alessandro Malfatti

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 01:14 AM

I think you misunderstood that part. You only cut off like half an inch, so that the auto loading mechanism doesn't have any problems... it refers mainly to films in which the beginning hasn't been cut properly, like with short ends or so, every time I bought film from Kodak the end was ready to use in the auto load. Understand? You don't have to lose the first five feet, it's just considered the leader because, unless you load the film in total darkness, it's going to be fogged.
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#11 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 03:44 AM

I own a Scoopic 16M, and I never clip the end of the film when loading the camera. Never had a jam, or any other problem. I always load and unload in the changing bag, so every frame from start to finish is usable.

By the way, Easton, are you getting a Scoopic 16 (old grey model) or a 16M (newer black model)? Because the 16M (or later 16MS) is vastly superior (better lens, 64fps, macro function, etc). If you haven't already committed to buying the camera yet, I'd highly recommend getting the later version.

Also, the 100ft take-up spools are standard - any 100' roll of Kodak or Fuji comes with one. Usually, you leave the spool from the last roll you shot in the camera, and that becomes your new take-up spool. If you don't have one (and you should always have a few extra), you can get them free from any film lab.
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#12 Will Montgomery

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 12:42 PM

Scoopics are about the easiest loading 16mm camera I've ever seen. Just push the film up into the mechanism, push the button and it sucks it right through. Similar to old school 16mm projectors. Then just thread the otherside onto an empty 100' reel and place the reel back into the camera in the direction that the arrows show.

Most stock from Kodak and Fuji will not need to be trimmed to load properly.

Great camera to learn on, its almost like a Super 8 witht the auto exposure system. Or maybe that makes it not such a good camera to learn on... too easy!
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#13 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 01:36 PM

You only cut off like half an inch, so that the auto loading mechanism doesn't have any problems...


Inside the Scoopic there is a cutter that slices the film at the ideal angle for loading the film, you only need to slice the film at its end, you're not cutting off 5' worth of useable film. It eliminates the risk of the end of the film jamming as it passes through the gate. I loaded a roll of Kodak Vision2 7217 once and noticed that the end WASN'T cut at an angle for loading, so you'll always want to make sure.

Also, when referring to any virgin raw stock, there's no such thing as leader...yet. Every 100' roll of film from Fuji and Kodak is actually 110'. They've given us an extra 10' for loading purposes, but I've probably never used up more than 2' when loading a Scoopic. Leaving me 108' of exposeable footage.
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#14 Will Montgomery

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 08:28 PM

Inside the Scoopic there is a cutter that slices the film at the ideal angle for loading the film, you only need to slice the film at its end, you're not cutting off 5' worth of useable film. It eliminates the risk of the end of the film jamming as it passes through the gate. I loaded a roll of Kodak Vision2 7217 once and noticed that the end WASN'T cut at an angle for loading, so you'll always want to make sure.


Interesting, I've loaded about 200 reels on my Scoopic MS and never once cut the film at an angle; it's always autoloaded perfectly with the straight cut from the factory.
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#15 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 09:19 PM

Keep in mind the only Scoopics I've used are from the local community college where they take a beating from the 100's of kids who use them every year, so they take quite a beating. Not to mention the issue room only cleans them once a year...maybe.

They've jammed on me a couple times...and an innumerable amount of times have they jammed while loading.

I'm not surprised you haven't had any problems though, since it's yours and you probably take good care of and service it regularly.
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#16 Easton Sheahan-Lee

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 10:54 PM

In terms of servicing, I was just thinking, using light silicon oil to lube some moving parts and clean dirty surfaces with a cotton swab and some rubbing alchohol....does this sound right?
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#17 Sir Alvin Ekarma

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 12:58 PM

In terms of servicing, I was just thinking, using light silicon oil to lube some moving parts and clean dirty surfaces with a cotton swab and some rubbing alchohol....does this sound right?


Depending on how much the camera was used before hand, you may want to have it sent to a place like Du-all for an over-haul/tune-up which will set you back $200-$300. Still, I only had my Scoopic serviced once and that was when it had to be repaired.
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#18 Easton Sheahan-Lee

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Posted 09 January 2007 - 01:05 AM

Are the scoopics really reliable cameras? BEcause like I live in Calgary and having a scoopic serviced here would require I ship it out to get it fixed which is just a ridiculous amount of work! Can I simply take care of it myself preventing the need for any additional labor?
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#19 Will Montgomery

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Posted 09 January 2007 - 09:29 AM

I'd suggest using Bernie O'Doherty at www.Super16inc.com.

He charged me $75 for a clean and lube for my K3 (I had him do other work as well) and I'm planing on sending him my Scoopic for a good cleaning as well. He's been doing this work for 30 years and he's extremely reliable.

I've had work done by Du-All on my K3 and my lens wasn't collimated correctly (maybe it went out in transit but I doubt it) which caused me some problems with focus on the Meteor lens.
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