Jump to content


Photo

ARRILASER


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Kenny N Suleimanagich

Kenny N Suleimanagich
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 900 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York

Posted 08 January 2007 - 09:12 PM

Have any of you had the chance to use it for your film? It's by far the most innovative printing machine I've ever seen. I was at Arri Burbank last week and they had one opened up. The insides are like a work of art.

Opinions!
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 08 January 2007 - 09:18 PM

It's pretty much the workhorse film recorder for D.I.'s and HD-to-35mm transfers. I've had six features transferred to 35mm IN on an Arrilaser, four shot in 24P HDCAM, one HDCAM-SR D.I. ("Shadowboxer") and one 4K-to-2K D.I. ("Astronaut Farmer".)

It's not for normal film printing, just recording digital files to 35mm.
  • 0

#3 Kenny N Suleimanagich

Kenny N Suleimanagich
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 900 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York

Posted 08 January 2007 - 09:52 PM

It's pretty much the workhorse film recorder for D.I.'s and HD-to-35mm transfers. I've had six features transferred to 35mm IN on an Arrilaser, four shot in 24P HDCAM, one HDCAM-SR D.I. ("Shadowboxer") and one 4K-to-2K D.I. ("Astronaut Farmer".)

It's not for normal film printing, just recording digital files to 35mm.

What the director and cinematographer of this recent project I A.C.'d on are doing was shot super35, ArriScan it to 4:2:2, did telecine, then are going back to film with Arrilaser, which I would say is the highest quality D.I. for a project I've worked on. And though I'm sure you arent amazed by such a process, when you're a high school junior like me it's more amazing than seeing the biggest diamond in the world in your hands.
  • 0

#4 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 08 January 2007 - 10:57 PM

I'm not sure you are describing the post path right -- 4:2:2 is a video format, not a digital scan, and you wouldn't both scan and then telecine the film. Telecine describes a film-to-video transfer and a scan is similar (film-to-digital data files), but it's a pin-registered single-frame-at-a-time process (film in a telecine moves continuously and is not pin-registered.)

So whether or not this Super-35 was telecine transferred to video for editing, the D.I. would have either involved an HD telecine session on a Spirit (to a 4:2:2 format if you are correct about that) or a data scan on a Arriscanner, which would be RGB (the equivalent in HD video would be 4:4:4, which would be more likely for an HD D.I. than 4:2:2, which is more used for HD mastering for home video.)
  • 0

#5 Kenny N Suleimanagich

Kenny N Suleimanagich
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 900 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York

Posted 09 January 2007 - 01:10 AM

Thank you for correcting me, it was edited in 4:2:2 after telecine. It wasnt a big enough project for 4:4:4, so after editing we went back and printed from that digital medium to film via Arrilaser. Either way, I was overwhelmed with the power of Arri post products.
  • 0


Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Opal

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

CineTape

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam