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Grindhouse


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 08 January 2007 - 10:32 PM

Has anyone seen the trailer for Grindhouse. Rose McGowen with a M16 and an M203 granade launcher as a prestetic leg. This is why I love Rodrequez and Tarrintino B)
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#2 Nate Downes

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Posted 09 January 2007 - 01:01 PM

Yup. On the behind the scenes, was weird seeing Rodriguez looking into the eyepiece of an Arri again.
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#3 Jim Hoene

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 07:06 PM

Yup. On the behind the scenes, was weird seeing Rodriguez looking into the eyepiece of an Arri again.


Did they shoot this in 16mm?
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#4 Troy Warr

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 07:43 PM

Did they shoot this in 16mm?

According to IMDB.com, the "Death Proof" segment was shot in 35mm, the rest of it apparently with a Panavision Genesis HD.
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#5 Matt Goldberg

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 01:48 PM

Yup. On the behind the scenes, was weird seeing Rodriguez looking into the eyepiece of an Arri again.


They have a behind-the-scenes already available? Where did you see this?
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#6 Nate Downes

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 08:31 AM

They have a behind-the-scenes already available? Where did you see this?


On aint it cool news IIRC. It was a few months ago, but I saw a setup with a modern Arri 35mm with Quinton behind the camera and Rodriguez looking through the viewfinder. Surprized me as I did not expect both directors to be operating at once.
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#7 Max Jacoby

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 11:55 AM

On aint it cool news IIRC. It was a few months ago, but I saw a setup with a modern Arri 35mm with Quinton behind the camera and Rodriguez looking through the viewfinder. Surprized me as I did not expect both directors to be operating at once.

Rodriguez was probably only posing for publicity stills...
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#8 Francesco Bonomo

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 12:06 PM

Rodriguez was probably only posing for publicity stills...


why?
it makes sense, he was the dp on Tarantino's part of the film, and that was shot with film cameras (I have some pictures taken on set where you can clearly see Panavision cameras at work, but i can't attach them because they're too big)
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#9 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 12:51 PM

It'll be very interesting to see an HD and 35mm film side by side like this.
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#10 Max Jacoby

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 03:32 PM

why?
it makes sense, he was the dp on Tarantino's part of the film, and that was shot with film cameras (I have some pictures taken on set where you can clearly see Panavision cameras at work, but i can't attach them because they're too big)

Rodriguez is known to be a bit of a credit hugger. He likes to have his picture taken wearing the steadicam and then get somebody else in to do most of the operating.

Too bad Tarantino couldn't get a proper Dop for his part of the film. Interestingly enough on those perenial Panavision Genesis adds in the AC, Jimmy Lindsey is credited as Dop.
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#11 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 05:09 PM

Rodriguez is known to be a bit of a credit hugger. He likes to have his picture taken wearing the steadicam and then get somebody else in to do most of the operating.


He usually takes at least 5: Director, DP, Camera Operator, Editor, Composer and Visual effects supervisor. Apparently, for Sin City II, he is planning cookery lessons so he can get the Catering credits too......
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#12 Matthew Buick

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 05:36 PM

Rodriguez is known to be a bit of a credit hugger. He likes to have his picture taken wearing the steadicam and then get somebody else in to do most of the operating.


What a git. :angry:
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#13 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 05:48 PM

He usually takes at least 5: Director, DP, Camera Operator, Editor, Composer and Visual effects supervisor. Apparently, for Sin City II, he is planning cookery lessons so he can get the Catering credits too......



Oops, looks like I forgot Producer, Writer, Special Effects, Sound Mixer and Soundtrack Supervisor....
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#14 freddie bonfanti

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 05:57 PM

[i] He likes to have his picture taken wearing the steadicam and then get somebody else in to do most of the operating.

Max,

is that something you know because you have actually seen it or did you read it somewhere in the net? i find it quite silly: that means that there is an uncredited steadycam operator out there who has been ripped off from Rodriguez in so many movies...come on, man!
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#15 Max Jacoby

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 06:25 PM

Dayplayers don't usually get credited, so it's not like Rodriguez is taking credit away from someone.
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#16 Francesco Bonomo

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 06:32 PM

a guy I talked to who saw them on location in Mexico said that Rodriguez was indeed operating A-Cam and Steadicam all the time.
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#17 Max Jacoby

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 08:51 PM

I didn't mean to imply that he never operates steadicam, but he uses steadicam operators as well. Which makes sense if you think about it. Steadicam is such a specialized skill that you cannot pick up just like that. It takes a lot of practice and it is ridiculous to think that someone like Rodriguez who is also a Director (and Writer and Producer and Dop and Editor and Composer and Sound Mixer and the list goes on) masters it as well as a dedicated operator. There are some shots that the weekend steadicam operator just cannot do.
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#18 Matt Goldberg

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 02:11 PM

I didn't mean to imply that he never operates steadicam, but he uses steadicam operators as well. Which makes sense if you think about it. Steadicam is such a specialized skill that you cannot pick up just like that. It takes a lot of practice and it is ridiculous to think that someone like Rodriguez who is also a Director (and Writer and Producer and Dop and Editor and Composer and Sound Mixer and the list goes on) masters it as well as a dedicated operator. There are some shots that the weekend steadicam operator just cannot do.


Do you know if there was a steadicam operator on his earlier films El Mariachi and Desperado? Or even if steadicams were utilized at all?

I agree, mastering steadicam takes a lot of time and practice to overcome. I have thought about RR's use of steadicam in his more recent films often, and I think that often his shots are being steadicamed by himself, but are not very long (~2 seconds or less). That may be one way to describe his style. That also may be one of the reasons his films have a rough-cut look with shots that do not feel complete, with less to choose from in the cutting room, but that is probably just a trademark of his films.

Edited by Matt Goldberg, 23 January 2007 - 02:13 PM.

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#19 Max Jacoby

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 03:57 PM

On 'From Dusk Till Dawn' Rodriguez is credited as steadicam operator, but there is an additional steadicam operator as well (David Chameides).
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#20 Zamir Merali

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 04:13 PM

In El Mariachi there was no steady cam because it only had a 7000 dollar budget. Rodriguez used a wheel chair dolly for some shots and he handheld the camera for others. SInce he used a very wide lens the motion appeared relatively smooth. In desperado however he had a 7 million dollar budget. INstead of hiring a steady cam operator rodriguez took a two day course and did it himself. then he editted around the bumps and shakes in his steadycam shots.
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