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Funny reel


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#1 Chayse Irvin

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 10:05 PM

At least I thought this reel was funny.

http://www.room.tv/p.../beautyreel.mov

ouch
Probably cheaper then plastic surgery. So fresh and so clean!

Edited by Chayse Irvin, 10 January 2007 - 10:07 PM.

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#2 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 03:06 AM

Great reel. I'm not sure the artists involved would like it very much, but it's a very effective way to sell himself. I was impressed.
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#3 Daniel Smith

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 02:12 PM

What I wouldn't mind knowing about all these 'digital adjustments' is how they get these alterations to look consistent throughout the shot.

What I mean is, I've only ever tried altering video like this once, in Photoshop with film strips, and one frame after another you could see how the alterations differed ever so slightly, sure the impurities were completely gone, but in the altered area, it just 'flickered' to some degree.

Is there some kind of secret to this in using after effects instead of Photoshop (which is primarily designed for stills)

Or is it just a case of practice, making sure the alterations in each and every frame match, so it looks fluent throughout the shot.

Thanks.
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#4 Jaxon Bridge

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 04:13 PM

What I wouldn't mind knowing about all these 'digital adjustments' is how they get these alterations to look consistent throughout the shot.

What I mean is, I've only ever tried altering video like this once, in Photoshop with film strips, and one frame after another you could see how the alterations differed ever so slightly, sure the impurities were completely gone, but in the altered area, it just 'flickered' to some degree.

Is there some kind of secret to this in using after effects instead of Photoshop (which is primarily designed for stills)

Or is it just a case of practice, making sure the alterations in each and every frame match, so it looks fluent throughout the shot.

Thanks.


I've often wondered this same thing myself; would like to hear from anyone that knows.
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#5 Chayse Irvin

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 06:52 PM

They could lay the same image over itself, apply a blur, a little color, and less contrast to the top image and add a feathered comp over the areas they want the effect. If they do it that way it would animate itself, they would just have to paint out the parts of the image where they dont want the effect... like an eyeball. rOOm probably uses flame or combustion. Not certain tho. Good question... gonna have to try it out when i get home. Getting rid of someones belly fat or double chin cant be easy to make look real.

Edited by Chayse Irvin, 11 January 2007 - 06:54 PM.

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#6 Will Earl

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 09:58 PM

Typically you paint a cleanplate fixing the the problem area, you track this to the original footage so it matches up, adjust the layers and edges in comp and your done. For changes to the outline of a performer (like double chins shot where she turns her head), then you'd need a background cleanplate as well as a roto shape to cull the excess chin. Using multiple cleanplates with a morph or blend would allow you to show new parts of the face as they are revealed.

The other similar example I've heard of is applying a sutle hourglass shape to actresses who are rather square-shaped in real life.
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Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Opal

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post