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HD Timelapse


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#1 Andrew Walker

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 01:02 PM

Here's some timelapse I did with a Canon 20D DSLR and the HVX. I'm sure some of you have already seen it from DVXuser. In two sizes.

http://599production...99/TLN480p.html

http://599production...99/TLN720p.html
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#2 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 08:33 PM

Here's some timelapse I did with a Canon 20D DSLR and the HVX. I'm sure some of you have already seen it from DVXuser. In two sizes.

http://599production...99/TLN480p.html

http://599production...99/TLN720p.html



The footage looks great but I don't understand something.

What is the 20D DSLR? I did a search but couldn't find it specifically. Is it a lens adaptor or
a different camera?

Edited by Jim Feldspar, 11 January 2007 - 08:34 PM.

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#3 Oliver Temmler

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 07:10 AM

What is the 20D DSLR?

It's a digital still picture SLR camera.

Beautiful stuff. What part is HVX and what part 20D? Or is that the magician's secret?
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#4 David B Bradshaw

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 11:25 AM

Nice stuff Andrew.

I've been using a Nikon D200 (it has an intervilometer built in). I have one question though, when I'm outside I've tried setting the camera with either shutter or aperture priority and I notice that my picture's exposures fluctuate ever so slightly. I've tried finding a proper exposure and switching everything over to manual, but the sun changes the exposure constantly. I'm relatively new to shooting time lapse on a DSLR but I think it's fantastic. I put a 4 GIG card in mine and can shoot all day. Plus I'm intercutting it into a high def show and since hi def is only equivalent to about 2 MEGP and my Nikon is 10.2, it looks great.

Any ideas?

Edited by David B Bradshaw, 12 January 2007 - 11:29 AM.

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#5 Jason Debus

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 11:40 AM

I have one question though, when I'm outside I've tried setting the camera with either shutter or aperture priority and I notice that my picture's exposures fluctuate ever so slightly. I've tried finding a proper exposure and switching everything over to manual, but the sun changes the exposure constantly.
Any ideas?


Never use auto (including aperature priority), always use manual settings. Yes the sun changes the exposure but that is the lesser evil (and can also be a benefit if you plan the shot well).

EDIT: I liked the night time lapse stuff but the name of your company in the middle of the image is kind of annoying.
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#6 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 08:40 PM

It's a digital still picture SLR camera.

Beautiful stuff. What part is HVX and what part 20D? Or is that the magician's secret?



Thanks, Oliver.

Yes, please tell. I'm impressed but baffled. How do you get time lapse using a still camera
with rolling video?
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#7 Michael Schrengohst

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 12:50 PM

1.) Nikon D200 - try manual exposure but with the lens wide open...
adjust exposure with shutter speed....
There is software to get rid of flicker...TinderBox with AE.
http://www.thefoundr...8D-B20DB7A46E7A

2.) Shooting a series of still photos and then use a program like
After Effects to produce a 1920x1080 format Quicktime movie at whatever frame rate you need.

3.) We have hundreds of timelapses shot with DSLR's on our site.

Edited by Michael Schrengohst, 14 January 2007 - 12:54 PM.

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#8 Andrew Walker

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 01:10 PM

Jim, its kind of the same concept with film. Running film is just a series of frame put together in order running at 24fps. That's the same way timelapse works except you are getting each frame at a much slower rate than 24fps.

The footage that was HVX was the clouds in the day time. I've tried using my HVX for some night stuff and for me it didn't cut it. Also never shoot auto just like everyone else said. But if you are doing some kind of day to night shot then you would have to use auto I guess. I haven't tried that yet. Seems like you would have to use a computer to change the aperture when the sun goes down enough.
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#9 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 04:34 PM

Never use auto (including aperature priority), always use manual settings. Yes the sun changes the exposure but that is the lesser evil (and can also be a benefit if you plan the shot well).


This good advice. I use a Canon EOS 10D for timelapse. I've had one or two that worked well with Aperture Priority, but on the whole, Manual is the way to go.

As far as assembling your stills into a movie goes, there are a number of ways, but the easiest is to use Quicktime Pro. There is an option to 'Open Image Sequence'. You specify the folder, and the frame rate,and it does the rest. You can then export it as any file format that QT supports.
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#10 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 07:31 PM

Jim, its kind of the same concept with film. Running film is just a series of frame put together in order running at 24fps. That's the same way timelapse works except you are getting each frame at a much slower rate than 24fps.

The footage that was HVX was the clouds in the day time. I've tried using my HVX for some night stuff and for me it didn't cut it. Also never shoot auto just like everyone else said. But if you are doing some kind of day to night shot then you would have to use auto I guess. I haven't tried that yet. Seems like you would have to use a computer to change the aperture when the sun goes down enough.


I've been in SUSPENSE for these answers. I have access to Final Cut Pro so I can't wait
to shoot some stuff and to check this out. That footage looks great. This is going to be soooo
cool!
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