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Slow motion with HD1?


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#1 Jim Keller

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 02:11 PM

First off, I'm a newbie in the HD world. I produce almost exclusively for the internet, where SD is plenty of resolution. However, the desire to get a true progressive-scan camera (again, because I produce almost exclusively for the internet) led me to discover that the JVC GR-HD1 -- probably by virtue of being an older and single-chip model -- is significanly less expensive than any progressive-scan SD camera on the market and therefore the only one in our price range. So it looks like I might be blundering into the HD world after all...

In reading the specs of the camera online, it appears that the HD1 records 30i by shooting 60p. Is this true? If so, does it truly record the 60p, and if it does can one capture (we use Final Cut Pro) the 60p?

The reason I ask is because I've never been happy with interpolated slow-motion effects, but if I can get 60 frames per seconds and then have the software re-interpret the frame rate to 30 frames per second, I could create a true slow-mo.

Would this actually work? These are idle musing at this point, because I don't have a project that needs it, but it would be good to know I have the option if we go with this camera.

Thanks!

--Jim
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#2 Thomas James

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 01:14 AM

I own the JVC GR-HD1 and I can tell you that it produces awesome 480p60 progressive scan footage which can be played back in slow motion. It actually records the full 60 frames per second. To import into final cut pro you will have to convert the 480p60 to 480p30 by slowing down the footage but at least you won't have to drop any frames. Also it is a big mistake to consider this camera a single chip camcorder because it has a hybrid primary complimentary color filteration system that rivals 3 CCD cameras in its color reproduction capability. Unfortuantely everytime I talk about the JVC camera some naysayer says that cell phones produce better video quality than JVC.
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#3 Jim Keller

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Posted 15 January 2007 - 08:50 PM

I own the JVC GR-HD1 and I can tell you that it produces awesome 480p60 progressive scan footage which can be played back in slow motion. It actually records the full 60 frames per second. To import into final cut pro you will have to convert the 480p60 to 480p30 by slowing down the footage but at least you won't have to drop any frames.


That's exactly what I was thinking should be possible based on the literature I was finding. Thanks!

Also it is a big mistake to consider this camera a single chip camcorder because it has a hybrid primary complimentary color filteration system that rivals 3 CCD cameras in its color reproduction capability. Unfortuantely everytime I talk about the JVC camera some naysayer says that cell phones produce better video quality than JVC.


I'm glad to hear you've been happy with the single-chip color. I hear people argue both sides, and in the end there's no way I'm going to know what I think of it until I've shot with it.

I've never been big on the "this camera good, that camera bad" arguments. Everything depends on how you use your equipment. Most cameras have some things they're very good at and some things they're not. The trick is to learn and then work with the equipment's idiosyncracies. From what I'm reading, it sounds like I'm going to need more even lighting than I'm used to using with my current Sony equipment, but that in exchange I'm going to get a spectacular clarity and resolution that DVCAM can't touch, and will never need to de-interlace again. Since everything I do allows to me to control the lighting and the production design (I'm not shooting documentaries), I expect I can compensate for any of the "shortcomings" I've heard people complain about.

At the end of the day, I can get a new HD1 or a used HD10 for about $1300, and the cheapest progressive-scanning SD camera I've been able to find run about twice that. That's a significant difference on my "spit and chewing gum" budgets.

And besides. I'm producing for the internet. The video codec will erase any subtlety of color anyway. :)
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#4 Jim Keller

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 10:56 PM

So it looks like I might be blundering into the HD world after all...


Not that anyone actually cares, but my HD1 arrived today. Very lightly used on eBay with a Pelican case for a smidge over $1000. I've only run a few tests, but so far I'm very impressed with the quality for the price.
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