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negative fill


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#1 Dave Plake

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 02:51 PM

could someone briefly explain the concept of negative fill?

thanks
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#2 Steve Larsen

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 03:13 PM

could someone briefly explain the concept of negative fill?

thanks


There are two ways to get contrast when there is none.. One is to add light and the other is to take it away. Negative fill refers to the removing light from the subject.. usually with something big and black.

In my opinion negative fill is the most under utilized way to create contrast and one of the most effective in many circumstances, also a lot less expensive...
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#3 Igor Trajkovski

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 10:08 PM

About the tools used for negative fill.

It could be frames. The same one used for diffusion.
Instead with diffuse or bounce material you put on a black material.

It could be black cardboards, foamcore painted black,
black drape/cloth hanging on wire, on wall, on backdrop holder....

Dedicated flags or cutters like:

http://www.matthewsg...p...cat=54&pg=1
The idea is to prevent light hitting the subject and not reflecting any back.

So the side preventing light hitting the subject directly could be any color and reflectivity but opaque.
The other side should be non-reflective - black.
Here a link with use of negative fill:
Color of Reflector equals Color of Reflection
Using_Digital_White_Balance_Outdoors - Outdoor Portrait

California Sunbounce - 1
California Sunbounce - 2
Usual disclaimer.
Regards

Igor Trajkovski
[/quote]


PS: Taken from my reply in a thread where
later on the question what is Negative Fill poped up.
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#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 11:17 PM

black drape/cloth...


Otherwise known as duvetyne or "Commando Cloth". It absorbs and cuts down light like no other :)
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#5 Dave Plake

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 01:20 PM

About the tools used for negative fill.

It could be frames. The same one used for diffusion.
Instead with diffuse or bounce material you put on a black material.

It could be black cardboards, foamcore painted black,
black drape/cloth hanging on wire, on wall, on backdrop holder....

Dedicated flags or cutters like:

http://www.matthewsg...p...cat=54&pg=1
The idea is to prevent light hitting the subject and not reflecting any back.

So the side preventing light hitting the subject directly could be any color and reflectivity but opaque.
The other side should be non-reflective - black.
Here a link with use of negative fill:
Color of Reflector equals Color of Reflection
Using_Digital_White_Balance_Outdoors - Outdoor Portrait

California Sunbounce - 1
California Sunbounce - 2
Usual disclaimer.
Regards

Igor Trajkovski
PS: Taken from my reply in a thread where
later on the question what is Negative Fill poped up.

thanks... good stuff
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#6 Igor Trajkovski

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 09:46 PM

Sure.
:)

Best,

Igor
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#7 janusz sikora

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 01:06 PM

The concept of Negative Fill is not to only prevent the light from falling on the subject but also to have the black surface reflect in the subject (face) thus creating/intensifying Lighting Ratio. :o
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#8 Paul Bruening

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 11:13 PM

Cloudy days are a great opportunity for negative fill.
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#9 Dave Plake

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Posted 15 January 2007 - 04:34 PM

Cloudy days are a great opportunity for negative fill.


why especially on cloudy days?
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#10 Evan Phan

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Posted 15 January 2007 - 09:16 PM

why especially on cloudy days?


Overcast days are normally look more flat and lack facial contrast due to the giant softbox created by the cloudy sky. So by putting up a black board or a wall of duvetyne on one side, you cut all the bounced light coming from that side, thus creating more contrast on the subject, which is whats traditionally desired in dramatic looks.

Sunny days already provide all the contrast you'll ever need, instead on sunny days you'd need to shoot or bounce MORE light into the shadows to get a manageable contrast range. It's all about getting the white to shadow contrast range managable depending on what youre doing.

Edited by Evan Phan, 15 January 2007 - 09:18 PM.

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The Slider

Metropolis Post

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Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Willys Widgets