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This makes me so MAD!


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#1 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 01:33 PM

I watch a lot of movies on DVD and I have a nice t.v. but not a giant home-entertainment
big screen. I like to read the credits but some movies have them so small that I simply
cannot make out names.

I know that it's not a t.v. title safe area issue because plenty of other movies have larger,
cleaner fonts and I can read who did what. Now maybe the small type is visible on the big
screen but since so many movies get seen on the small screen, why can't the producers
or whomever look out for this?

Also, some people on lower budgeted/indie. movies may have worked for cut-rate or free,
so they REALLY deserve a little recognition, don't you think?

Edited by Jim Feldspar, 13 January 2007 - 01:34 PM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 01:39 PM

There is a belief that large letters on a theater screen for credits (especially end credits) look a little "tacky" and low-budget.

Also, the format will determine the size because in most theaters, a scope print shares the same height as a 1.85 image, whereas on a letterboxed transfer, a scope image will share the same width instead, thus making the image smaller on the screen. So titles for scope movies may look the "correct" size in the theaters but look small on TV. But since the scope format only really makes sense for theaterical projection (since it is a bigger picture horizontally -- the original intent of CinemaScope -- not a shorter picture vertically, which what happens on TV) most people making titles for scope movies are going to make them look good for the theater, not for TV.

Now occasionally for theatrical movies shown later on broadcast TV (not DVD) the titles are redone in video to make them bigger in size, plus fit the 4x3 proportions.
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#3 Greg Gross

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 01:51 PM

One of my gripes is that I'm always looking for A&B camera operators and gaffers.
Of course people sometimes obstruct your view when they stand up. Then again the
credits roll so fast. Well I guess we cannot have every wish come true.

Greg Gross
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#4 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 08:47 PM

There is a belief that large letters on a theater screen for credits (especially end credits) look a little "tacky" and low-budget.

Also, the format will determine the size because in most theaters, a scope print shares the same height as a 1.85 image, whereas on a letterboxed transfer, a scope image will share the same width instead, thus making the image smaller on the screen. So titles for scope movies may look the "correct" size in the theaters but look small on TV. But since the scope format only really makes sense for theaterical projection (since it is a bigger picture horizontally -- the original intent of CinemaScope -- not a shorter picture vertically, which what happens on TV) most people making titles for scope movies are going to make them look good for the theater, not for TV.

Now occasionally for theatrical movies shown later on broadcast TV (not DVD) the titles are redone in video to make them bigger in size, plus fit the 4x3 proportions.


Learn something here all the time. Thanks.


One of my gripes is that I'm always looking for A&B camera operators and gaffers.
Of course people sometimes obstruct your view when they stand up. Then again the
credits roll so fast. Well I guess we cannot have every wish come true.

Greg Gross


Yes, one of the things that's fun, sort of in reverse of what you said but related I think,
is when you see a D.P. that you like and then you start to notice that person credited
on older movies as an operator and you see with which D.P.s he or she worked.

Don't see too many gaffers make the jump, though.
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#5 David Sweetman

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 11:59 PM

If you really want to know, you could look for a dvd player with a "zoom" function
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#6 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 15 January 2007 - 06:41 AM

If you really want to know, you could look for a dvd player with a "zoom" function


That is a really good idea! Thanks.
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#7 Shane Bartlett

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Posted 15 January 2007 - 07:41 AM

Or try IMDB.
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