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What's your favorite camera for handheld?


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#1 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 07:27 AM

I hear people talk about Aatons all the time but I really liked using an Arris 16 SR.
What do you thimk? Thanks.
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#2 Tim Carroll

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 10:12 AM

If you pad your shoulder really well and stick to prime lenses, with a clip on sunshade instead of lightweight rods and a matte box, the Arriflex 16SR is not that bad. Definitely not my favorite hand held camera, as I used to own one and found it to be somewhat of a pain.

If you are going to be using the 16SR, don't first try an Aaton, because it will really highlight the differences with the two camera designs. I made that mistake and found myself really not liking the 16SR for hand held after using the Aaton.

-Tim
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#3 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 10:26 AM

Aaton XTR prod is my favourite. Aaton Minima is useful for cramped situations as well as the built-in intervalometer that has come in handy a few times.
That said - Necessity is the mother of invention and if an Arri SR is all that's available then you'll have to adapt to that.
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#4 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 06:18 PM

I like SR's for handheld, but I've never used an Aaton, although I've heard good things. I'm looking forward to using an Arri 416 for the first time. I think it's probably a more comfortable camera to handhold than an SR. I've messed around with the 416 a bit, but actually doing a job with it is the only way to really know.
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#5 steve hyde

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 11:23 PM

I guess there is hand-held and then there is shoulder-mounted. I have used an Aaton and loved the stability of it on my shoulder. Hand held I have also used a B&H FilmoDR and I like the way that you can brace the camera flat against the forehead and I like the natural lifting position of the right hand on it. I think Bolex cameras are one of the more awkward cams for hand held. It is a lot like holding a hand bag against your face.
I don't use them for that reason.

Steve
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#6 Robert Hughes

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Posted 15 January 2007 - 04:16 PM

I second Steve's observation on Filmo vrs Bolex handheld operation. The 70DA/DR lays right on my forehead while I look thru the viewfinder. But the 70HR, with the wider offset viewfinder, is terribly uncomfortable if you try to handhold while shooting 100' internal loads. Note the 70HR with the 400' magazine becomes a shoulder mounted camera (same for the Eyemo with a 400' magazine), and is pretty comfortable to shoot with despite its heaviness and weird, unlikely ergonomics.

Of course any modern camera such as the Aaton will be a better shoulder mount camera than the above ones, in addition to being a better all around machine.
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#7 Hans Engstrom

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 11:56 AM

If you are going to be using the 16SR, don't first try an Aaton, because it will really highlight the differences with the two camera designs. I made that mistake and found myself really not liking the 16SR for hand held after using the Aaton.

-Tim


That´s exactly my experience as well. I used to think that the SR was kind of nice shooting handheld with, then I tried a XTR and it completely changed my perspective on how a handheld camera should be. That´s one reason why I bought a LTR instead of a SR.
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#8 Deepak Bajracharya

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 10:16 AM

Namaste,

I find myself very comfortable with 16BL camera for handheld works. Yet to go through SR, XTrpod etc.

Regards,
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#9 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 11:04 AM

Namaste,

I find myself very comfortable with 16BL camera for handheld works. Yet to go through SR, XTrpod etc.

Regards,



Wow. Do you use a shoulder brace or support?
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#10 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 01:59 PM

The Eyemo (or Filmo) with a 400 ft mag is really not for hand or shoulder use.
Especially an Eyemo with the spider turret and focusing viewfinder.
I mean if you really had to but geez...
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#11 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 02:04 PM

I've yet to use the SR3 or 416, but I hear they're wayyyy better than the SR or SRII for handheld. I prefer the Aaton for ergonomics, plus it's just a fantastic piece of equipment. But the nicest cam I have access to is an SR, and handheld/shoulder mounted shooting is easily manageable with a little padding on your shoulder and the handy pistol grip.

I wanna play with a 416 now :)
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#12 stephen defilippi

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 02:28 PM

I do also like my filmo, and hate the bolex for hand-held. I prefer/ love my arriflex 16st for hand-held work. It has that ergonomic handle and a standard eye-level eyepiece. It works best for hand held with the 100' internal film loads . That's not so true with a 400' magazine, although even then, if I use an extension "elbow" eyepiece, its still reasonably easy to work with.
stephen
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#13 Matthew Buick

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 04:04 PM

I imagine I would like the SR, XTR and other such types.
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#14 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 05:11 PM

The Aaton wins hands down, the flat base plate just doesnt sit will on a shoulder, nor is it as confortable to hold under your arm.

Plus i'm 6' 4 tall, so the fact that the Aaton sits down lower on the shoulder is much better.
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#15 Jon Kukla

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 02:45 AM

For basic form-factor ergonomics and weight, I would agree that the Aaton XTR series is an excellent option. However, I really dislike the somewhat quirky choices made in virtually all other regards with that camera line, as compared to the SRs, which I've always found very easy and intuitive cameras. So I was very happy to see the 416 appear, as it seems to be the best of both worlds. Ultimately, all three of these cameras can get the job done, so it's simply a question of budget, availability, and what you want to use them for.

The A-Minima is also a great camera, but its size and film capacity do somewhat limit its ideal applications, although in theory you can use it for most of what the above cameras can do.
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#16 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 04:46 AM

I've yet to use the SR3 or 416, but I hear they're wayyyy better than the SR or SRII for handheld.

All of the SR's are the same body design.

Plus i'm 6' 4 tall, so the fact that the Aaton sits down lower on the shoulder is much better.

That's what knees are for man! I'm 6'5 and I have to use my knees often. I'd much rather have to bend my knees, as oppossed to having to call in a taller operator.

The A-Minima is also a great camera, but its size and film capacity do somewhat limit its ideal applications, although in theory you can use it for most of what the above cameras can do.

But in all reality it's a total pain to handhold for any length of time. If I can't put a camera on my shoulder I'd prefer not to have to handhold it, unless by the handle.
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#17 Tim Carroll

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 09:33 AM

I wanna play with a 416 now :)


Got to play with one at NAB last year, it fits your shoulder really nice.

Posted Image

-Tim
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#18 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 06:03 PM

That's what knees are for man! I'm 6'5 and I have to use my knees often. I'd much rather have to bend my knees, as oppossed to having to call in a taller operator.


True, actually its nice to hear you're taller than me, I always wondered if I would be too tall to ever seek a career as a steadicam operator.

Back to the Aaton, something wierd I remember when using it last (June) was that I was waiting for an operation to fix my shoulder (i'd smashed it up in bike accident in Febuary), my brocken collar bone was struting up out my shoulder and the unusual design of the camera fited perfectly around the lump. So there you are, Aaton - 'fits like a cat on the shoulder, even on a shoulder with an ununited collar-bone.'

;)
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#19 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 05:27 AM

I prefer the Aaton for handholding as well, but I find the Sachtler quick-release plate from the tripod always digs into my collarbone, so I have to use a shoulder pad of some sort. Do you guys find this as well?

As for handholding the SR, you can use an Arri bridgeplate to balance the camera on your shoulder, since it tends to be front heavy with a zoom lens. Makes it a bit heavier though. The pistol grip for the SR2 doesn't stick out far enough for good balance.
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#20 Tim Carroll

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 10:10 AM

The pistol grip for the SR2 doesn't stick out far enough for good balance.


That was always my biggest gripe about the SR. I tried a number of different things to solve that problem. Finally found a cheap set of Cavision handles that I could place on a set of lightweight rods and slid them up to right behind the matte box mount, and that helped balance the camera better. But you lose the On/Off switch.

As far as the Aaton, I know it is time consuming, but I take the tripod mount off the camera when I put it on my shoulder.

-Tim
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