Jump to content


Photo

Original negative used for VHS / DVD release?


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Patrick Cooper

Patrick Cooper
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 868 posts
  • Other

Posted 20 January 2007 - 12:17 AM

First off, I must say that I am vaguely familiar with the basic steps involved in producing a reversal print from a movie for theatrical projection. As I understand, after the negative is developed, a duplicate copy of the negative is made and reversal prints are made from the duplicate negative so as not to harm the precious camera original.

However, when releasing a movie for VHS or DVD release, is it standard practise to telecine the original negative or the duplicate copy of the negative? I am assuming the original negative is scanned for best quality but I can't help but think of the risks involved with damage, scratching and possible loss in transport. I know these risks are minimal as the negs are handled by professionals but we are all human afterall and humans make mistakes. Could be a worry for a big budget Hollywood production.
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19760 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 20 January 2007 - 12:43 AM

Generally you'd make a color interpositive (IP) off of the original negative for protection, and if you had even more money, you'd make b&w separations (YCM's).

But more movies and TV's created from scans or telecine transfers of the original negative, that are only finished to video, often there is no protection film master made. It's slightly less necessary since the negative is not being handled much, maybe two or more passes in a telecine or scanner at the most.

There used to be a practice of going back and conforming the original camera rolls into an edited master, after a TV show was finished on video, but I'm not sure how many do that anymore, not with so many electronic editing tricks being used in the cut. Maybe they just vault the camera rolls and leave it at that. Mike Most?

I'm not sure what you mean by the term "reversal print" -- generally I think that means a reversal copy of a reversal original, for projection.
  • 0

#3 Patrick Cooper

Patrick Cooper
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 868 posts
  • Other

Posted 20 January 2007 - 11:57 PM

"I'm not sure what you mean by the term "reversal print" -- generally I think that means a reversal copy of a reversal original, for projection."

I'm referring to the positive print made from the duplicate of the negative - for projection at the cinema. What would be the genuine name for this print? Additionally, what would be the genuine name for the 'duplicate negative'?
  • 0

#4 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19760 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 21 January 2007 - 02:21 AM

"I'm not sure what you mean by the term "reversal print" -- generally I think that means a reversal copy of a reversal original, for projection."

I'm referring to the positive print made from the duplicate of the negative - for projection at the cinema. What would be the genuine name for this print? Additionally, what would be the genuine name for the 'duplicate negative'?


It would go:

35mm original neg --> print OR

35mm original neg --> interpositive (I.P.) --> dupe negative (sometimes called an internegative, or I.N., but there is some disagreement on that) --> print

The interpositive and internegative / dupe negative are the same intermediate lab stock. Each generation creates the opposite in density of the previous generation -- they are all "negative" stocks in that sense, so a negative picture of a negative is a positive image, etc.

It's a "print" whether or not it's off of the original negative or dupe negative, although sometimes the ones off of the dupe negative are called release prints, and ones off of the original negatives are called show prints or E.K. prints. But one could make one's release prints off of the original negative. There are lots of terms for prints: composite prints (ones with a soundtrack), answer print (for timing), check print (a silent one-light print usually of a timed dupe negative / I.N.), etc. And the last answer print, if it's a composite print, may end up being your show print, etc.

But reversal print is something else because it uses reversal stock to make a positive print of a positive original for projection.
  • 0

#5 Leo Anthony Vale

Leo Anthony Vale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2010 posts
  • Other
  • Pittsburgh PA

Posted 22 January 2007 - 03:35 PM

35mm original neg --> interpositive (I.P.) --> dupe negative (sometimes called an internegative, or I.N., but there is some disagreement on that) --> print


the practice at the lab is that internegative and interpositive are color.

A dupe negative is B/W and is made from a fine grain master (FGM).

To add to the confusion, I/Ns from Technicolor were often labeled I/Ds.
Which I'm guessing is intermediate dupe.

Edited by Leo Anthony Vale, 22 January 2007 - 03:37 PM.

  • 0


FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Glidecam

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Opal

Technodolly

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

CineTape

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc