Jump to content


Photo

Good telecine house for a short.


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Drew Hoffman

Drew Hoffman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Chicago, IL

Posted 22 January 2007 - 02:41 AM

I'm doing a 16mm short. The script is about 23 pages and I'm looking to find that magical balance of good prices and good work. I usually have my film processed by FotoKem and telecine'd at Magic Film & Video Works, but I'm wondering if anyone hasn't had good experiences somewhere else. I've heard good things about Pro8mm and Bonolabs. I was wondering if anyone could back this up or refute it, or if there isn't some other place I might look into. There aren't any houses in AZ and I have to send the film out no matter what, so location isn't a big deal. It'd be nice if I could be there for the telecine, but it's pretty low budget and that doesn't always happen.
Thanks.
  • 0

#2 Will Montgomery

Will Montgomery
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2030 posts
  • Producer
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 23 January 2007 - 05:05 PM

I've heard good things about Pro8mm and Bonolabs. I was wondering if anyone could back this up or refute it, or if there isn't some other place I might look into.
Thanks.


Pro8mm has a spotty rep. While I haven't had problems with their processing, their telecine in both 16mm and Super 8 was flat, had hairs and dust bunnies (I verified not on the film, in the transfer) and ghosting images. They may have a good colorist and machine somewhere over there, but he hasn't worked on my film.

Bonolabs - Their philosophy is to give a completely neutral transfer and let you adjust the color which is smart if you have experience doing that. I personally like working with a good colorist who can match the mood of the story and add a little something to the film. They do alot of government work transfering archival footage.

I'd recommend talking to Flying Spot Film Transfer in Seattle. A smaller shop, but they have excellent newer equipment and talented colorists and decent standby rates.
http://www.fsft.com/

A company I work with here in Dallas, TX is called Video Post and Transfer. They do excellent work and have three suites, the low-end equipment being Pro8mm's highest end.

http://www.videopost.com/
  • 0

#3 Bryan Darling

Bryan Darling
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 227 posts
  • Director
  • Sacramento, CA

Posted 24 January 2007 - 02:10 AM

What's your price at Magic? I've used Monaco for years as I'm in Sacramento and it was easy to drive down to supervise. I've had a roll of 16mm b&w reversal transfered at Spectra Film & Video. It was a very nice transfer, extremely sharp...almost too sharp in my opinion. The operator is also one of the owners and he was the lead colorist for Pro8mm.
  • 0

#4 Robert Houllahan

Robert Houllahan
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1582 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Providence R.I.

Posted 24 January 2007 - 02:48 AM

I've used Monaco for years as I'm in Sacramento and it was easy to drive down to supervise.

A bit of advice as someone who is routinely on both sides of this fence, getting a good relationship together with a colorist/TK house and being able to go in and work with someone is worth an awful lot. There is so much possibility in a Film / Telecine session sometimes getting what you want requires being there.

-Rob-
  • 0

#5 Michael Most

Michael Most
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 765 posts
  • Other

Posted 24 January 2007 - 09:07 AM

A bit of advice as someone who is routinely on both sides of this fence, getting a good relationship together with a colorist/TK house and being able to go in and work with someone is worth an awful lot. There is so much possibility in a Film / Telecine session sometimes getting what you want requires being there.


It's also not necessarily about finding the cheapest price. It's about using a company you can trust, equipment that can do the job properly, and people you know, trust, and can work with. As with anything, you often get what you pay for.
  • 0

#6 Bryan Darling

Bryan Darling
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 227 posts
  • Director
  • Sacramento, CA

Posted 24 January 2007 - 02:31 PM

A bit of advice as someone who is routinely on both sides of this fence, getting a good relationship together with a colorist/TK house and being able to go in and work with someone is worth an awful lot. There is so much possibility in a Film / Telecine session sometimes getting what you want requires being there.

-Rob-



This is so true and so important. I wholeheartedly agree. I've always had the same colorist on my projects and it's great. A good one learns and can anticipate what you like and are trying to achieve based on your aesthetics. Like any other job, you have people that can operate things and you have people that can master things.

I also completely agree with Mike. The lab I've used for telecine and processing is not the cheapest but their rep is decent and they have always turned out good results for me. Their people are competent, friendly, and fun. This principle should hold true for any business you patronize.
  • 0


Glidecam

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Opal

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks