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Letters from Iwo Jima...


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#1 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 24 January 2007 - 02:17 AM

Great story with some fantastic performances. But I'd say its quality is on par with the small screen quality of the great mini-series "Band of Brothers". The special effects weren't very "special" (especially when the Americans are landing on the beach), and the color palette along with the high contrast images really began to grow tiring.

Directorially I don't know why it's nominated, it seemed very stylized at times, especially during one of the killings where blood was spattered on a wall in typical horror fashion, ha ha. Also, notice how they made the reds & oranges in the explosions and fire really pop in the desaturated environment...kinda weirded me out a bit.

I haven't seen "Flags of our Fathers" yet, so I can't compare the two.

See it for the story though, that at least kept me involved, and Ken Watanabe is excellent as usual.
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#2 steve hyde

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 03:53 PM

....a singular masterpiece of war cinema.

This film poses questions and leaves the audience to find answers. It illuminates the importance of questioning authority and at the same time it leaves loyalty intact. It casts the logic of blind-patriotism into doubt along with shallow conceptions of good and evil. Perhaps it will be the beginning of a new form of war cinema that truly subverts the notions of *us versus them* and leaves audiences with the notion that perhaps, on earth, there is only *us*. I cannot think of more important questions to pose about the logic of war. The filmmakers shot a bullseye.

The battle choreography in the film is incredible: bleak and impossible. The desaturated look was perfect and very suitable for the portrait-style photography that characterized the film. There was no romantization of landscapes, no lush colors to aesthetisize the picture, just cold clear truths about war rendered in black and white. I'd like to learn more about how the filmmakers accomplished this look.

Steve
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#3 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 04:00 PM

There was no romantization of landscapes, no lush colors to aesthetisize the picture, just cold clear truths about war rendered in black and white. I'd like to learn more about how the filmmakers accomplished this look.


DI and very high contrast lighting
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#4 steve hyde

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 04:39 PM

DI and very high contrast lighting



Film stocks?

Steve
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#5 Angeliki Makraki

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 02:52 PM

I got dizzy from watching Letters from Iwo Jima.
I don't know if it was the theatre I saw it in
or the Greek subtitles that where white on white, but I left after an hour.
The lighting really bothered me.
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#6 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 02:57 PM

Film stocks?

Steve


Kodak Vision 250D 5246, 500T 5279

The latest AC Mag has the full story.



And Angeliki, I agree with you partly. The extreme contrast and desaturation of the images got a bit much for me, but I still made it through. It gave me a hunger to see something colorful afterwards...so that same night I went and saw "Pan's Labyrinth"
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#7 Angeliki Makraki

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 03:05 PM

Kodak Vision 250D 5246, 500T 5279

The latest AC Mag has the full story.
And Angeliki, I agree with you partly. The extreme contrast and desaturation of the images got a bit much for me, but I still made it through. It gave me a hunger to see something colorful afterwards...so that same night I went and saw "Pan's Labyrinth"


Jonathan, what do you call that type of bright white light coming from the upper left ?
That is what bothered me.
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#8 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 09:32 PM

Jonathan, what do you call that type of bright white light coming from the upper left ?
That is what bothered me.


I assume you're talking about a kicker or backlight, which there was a lot of during the cave scenes especially.
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#9 Angeliki Makraki

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 11:08 PM

I assume you're talking about a kicker or backlight, which there was a lot of during the cave scenes especially.

Not sure !
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#10 Srujan Sriram

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Posted 19 February 2011 - 08:55 PM

Not sure !


Angeliki,

What light are you refering to? Could you post an image or some kind of depiction.

Srujan
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#11 Brian Hulnick

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 03:23 AM

A superb movie, sure Mr Eastwood's best. I enjoyed it far more that Flags Of Our Fathers. I for one liked the color/ lighting, it suited the mood of the film.
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#12 Markshaw

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 03:45 AM

I watched Flags Of Our Fathers and thought this is great, then I watched Letters From Iwo Jima and was completely floored. What a superb movie. I was very deeply moved by the characters. It made the Japanese seem more human/ humane and Ken Watanabe's acting was again top notch. To me he is God. :ph34r:
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Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Visual Products

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rebotnix Technologies

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Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Opal