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Kodak Vision 2 stocks on a Nizo Pro


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#1 joby clegg

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 05:01 PM

Hello,

I'm a newbie to this forum and a newbie to filmaking and I could really do with some pointers. I will start shooting my first super 8 short next week, I will be using a Nizo Professional (with a Nizo 461 M as backup) with vision 2 film stock at 24 fps. I decided to go for Vision 2 negative stock because:

a: most of the film will take place either outside at sunrise or inside a train in the early morning, so it will be relatively lowlight.
b: i heard, though i don't understand exactly why, that negative film is more forgiving of exposure errors, and is better for telecine.

I will shoot tests of both 200t and 500t next week and see if I can post them. My question is:

1: Do I absolutly need an 85 daylight filter? Even on the train where there is a mixture of artificial and dawnlight? And if so, do I need to bore holes in the cartridges in order to release the internal daylight filter in the Nizo Pro? I'd rather not have to buy an external 85 filter because i will also need a wide-angle lens in some of the train scenes.

2: I know everyone says to use a seperate light meter, but I am a beginner and would like to keep things as simple as possible on the shoot. I understand from other posts that the nizo pro will read the 200T as 100ASA, if I take a reading from the internal light-meter, then switch to manual and go up 1/2 an f-stop, will that work out as the slightly over-exposed result which is supposed to be good for this stock?

I very much hope someone out there knows the answers, or can point me in a good direction, trying to find this stuff out via google just leaves me more and more confused.

all the best,

joby
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#2 Andres Pardo aka Gral Treegan

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Posted 26 January 2007 - 11:16 PM

but I am a beginner and would like to keep things as simple as possible on the shoot.


Hi!!

if you want to keep it simple just do it. run the film with out any filter and with the internal light meter.
after... look your footage and learn from what youve done.

my opinion, the best way to learn how to shoot is ruining some feets of film

have fun!!
Treegan
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#3 Fran Kuhn

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 01:07 AM

1: Do I absolutly need an 85 daylight filter?


The simple answer is, "no". You can do a correction in telecine, although it is, technically speaking, ideal to try and filter for large film type/light source discrepancies (in this case tungsten film shot in daylight).


If I take a reading from the internal light-meter, then switch to manual and go up 1/2 an f-stop, will that work out as the slightly over-exposed result which is supposed to be good for this stock?


This should work well provided the camera's meter is functioning properly. I'd suggest you take along an 18-percent gray card. If possible place the card in the scene (or in lighting similar to the scene you're going to film) and take your meter reading from the card and manually set this exposure. If you can't do this, simply take an average reading from the scene you're trying to film by trying to avoid exceptionally bright or dark objects or areas within the scene--these will give readings that will cause you to underexpose or overexpose the film.
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#4 joby clegg

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 06:10 AM

Thank you very much for the advice, I will try to do a test with the grey card to start with as I have limitted resources and can't really afford to mess up too many rolls. I'll also try using an external filter on all non-wideangle shots, does anyone know whether one should go for an 85 or an 85b for Vision 2, as there seems to some controversy about this.

thanks again,

joby
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#5 Fran Kuhn

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 01:19 PM

Thank you very much for the advice, I will try to do a test with the grey card to start with as I have limitted resources and can't really afford to mess up too many rolls. I'll also try using an external filter on all non-wideangle shots, does anyone know whether one should go for an 85 or an 85b for Vision 2, as there seems to some controversy about this.

thanks again,

joby


Joby,

If you are going to telecine there is very little practical difference between and 85 and an 85B. The 85 will render your film just very slightly "cooler" compared to the 85B and this small difference will be easily corrected during the transfer. If you have a choice, get the 85B. The 85 may be easier to find and will provide virtually the same result.

BTW, if your exposures are even anywhere near correct, the negative film, because of it's inherent latitude, will help you get a great result.
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#6 Chris Burke

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 01:44 PM

Thank you very much for the advice, I will try to do a test with the grey card to start with as I have limitted resources and can't really afford to mess up too many rolls. I'll also try using an external filter on all non-wideangle shots, does anyone know whether one should go for an 85 or an 85b for Vision 2, as there seems to some controversy about this.

thanks again,

joby



For best results, shoot a grey card for each lighting set up and a framing chart at the very beginning of your roll. The reason for this is it will give the colorist the information she needs to give you the best results. The grey card will give a standard by which they can balance color temps and exposure. The framing chart may be a bit of overkill for super 8, but it never hurts, it will tell her how you framed your shot and how it should be transfered, ie.....if you want the transfer matted for widescreen or not. In terms of exposure; if you have an external meter and your camera has a manually adjustable ? stop, then by all means go manual. I am rather surprised that none of the previous posts recommended this. You will get the correct exposure and not have to worry about if the camera can handle it or not. Meter for both highlights and shadows and take an average of that. It is always a good idea to overexpose the shots by 1/3 to 2/3 (depending upon preference). This will help manage the grain that will be evident in the low light shots. If you do nothing else, do a test. This will let you know how and why the film looks the way it does. Super 8 is one of my favorite formats. I wish you the best of luck.

chris
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#7 Fran Kuhn

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 04:03 PM

In terms of exposure; if you have an external meter and your camera has a manually adjustable ? stop, then by all means go manual. I am rather surprised that none of the previous posts recommended this.


Hi Chris,

Probably because his initial post implied he wanted to keep things simple by using the in-camera meter.

Fran
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