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Water Towers or Sprinkler system.


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#1 Bradley Stonesifer

Bradley Stonesifer

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 12:18 AM

We are shooting a music video in a sound stage with no drainage in the floors. We are trying to shoot a sequence in which the sprinklers are set off and water falls on the crowd during the performance. It is a fairly small area, 30 x 50, and we figure we will probably shoot the water coming out of the sprinkler as an insert, however I was wondering if anyone had any ideas as to how to build a ?sprinkler system? that could provide a constant flow of drizzling water and be able to control it without flooding the studio.

We have priced rain towers and they are just too expensive. We are trying to find a way to manipulate what is seen on camera to sell water falling throughout the space without having to deal with ?water falling on the space?.

We have very little money and want to do it on the cheap.
Any input of experience in dealing with this scenario would be greatly appreciated or any companies in the L.A. area that could help us.

Thanks

Bradley Stonesifer
Director of Photography
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#2 Bob Hayes

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 01:06 AM

Your problem isn?t the rain tower but drenching the stage. Maybe save the effect shot and cheat it outside.
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#3 Frank DiBugnara

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 01:17 AM

For a spot this year, we were able to get local fire to provide rain for our shoot. We found the best result was when we could get the firefighters and hose 20 feet in the air--in our case using a scissor lift. They then shot a medium to narrow stream straight up. By the time the water came down sixty feet later, it looked like very believable rain. We had two hoses going at the same time for more spread. Also, we found it was easier to use a tanker truck than to deal with all the water permits needed to tap into the hydrants. With many short takes, we only used half the water in the truck.

If you are able to get these shots outside, maybe something like this would be an option for you.

Edited by Frank DiBugnara, 27 January 2007 - 01:19 AM.

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