Jump to content


Photo

wHAT DOES A PROFESSIONAL SHOT LIST LOOK LIKE


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 bolshevik

bolshevik
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Student

Posted 27 January 2007 - 03:04 PM

Does anyone have a template or a sample of a real shotlist from a professional feature film. I know all the basics cu, mcu, ecu, ws etc...but I'd like to see a sample of something more comprehensive. like how would you abbreviate panning, raking, zooming, or even zollying in a shot list. and also, when youre covering a scene and say your master is shot 1a and maybe you go in for coverage and do a medium single but that medium single shot wouldnt begin until halfway into the master then is it 1aa or 1b? I've looked all over for a "real"shot list and cant find a thing...
  • 0

#2 Max Jacoby

Max Jacoby
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2955 posts
  • Other

Posted 27 January 2007 - 03:43 PM

Eh, well each shotlist is different and it basically comes down to what works for you, what allows you to communicate your ideas. Keep in mind that on the set the director will be explaining the shots anyway, so most people just do a little reminder to themselves. It's important not to get hung up with a shotlist, you want to let your actors rehearse first and see how they move naturally, instead of moving them around like chess figures.
  • 0

#3 Brian Dzyak

Brian Dzyak
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1481 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Encino, California USA

Posted 27 January 2007 - 03:50 PM

Most shot lists I've seen are hastily scribbled on a torn piece of paper that the Director had lying around that morning. For FX days, large showcard or posterboard usually is used with all the storyboards for the day pinned up in order.

But there usually isn't "time" to create anything fancy. Unless there is a special shot to do or the Director is prone to wacky angles, most scenes begin with the standard master then "over over" in two sizes. Obviously dollys and other moves get tossed in there, but on the whole, the basic "shot list" is the same from setup to setup.
  • 0

#4 Ken Gregg

Ken Gregg

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Arizona

Posted 14 October 2009 - 02:34 AM

You can create your own based on the following links.

Completed Production
http://www.scribd.co...List-Template-1

Blank Template
http://www.filmcontr...orm.php?id=1022
  • 0

#5 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3707 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 14 October 2009 - 03:56 AM

Usually the 1st AD wants to see a shot list so they can schedule the day's filming.

Completed production example is a bit confusing in that you really don't need to have the cutting indicated, more the overall action and dialogue coverage in each shot during filming.

The second one seems to do cover it, although you could add more columns eg camera movement according to personal taste. It's basically there to communicate with the crew and to ensure you don't forget anything.
  • 0

#6 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 14 October 2009 - 09:59 AM

Mine are usually pretty shorthand in a notebook I keep; they're not formal at all. They're strictly a reminder for me and perhaps the director if he doesn't do his own version.
  • 0

#7 Gus Sacks

Gus Sacks
  • Sustaining Members
  • 285 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York, NY

Posted 16 October 2009 - 12:24 PM

Sample from a feature. Obviously everyone does it differently.

Attached Files


  • 0

#8 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5942 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 16 October 2009 - 08:39 PM

I have an excel spread-sheet which I basically list the type of shot as well as what dialogue it is intended to cover (if any). The master is normally the longest and then close ups are in there as well but just on the lines which have been deemed important so as to keep from covering the whole scene in the master and then also in the closes if we're certain only some lines will be used. Though this is just a rough guideline and as mentioned can change incredibly when you get an actor in a space doing their thing. As mentioned it's normally good to board any major sequences (fights/chases/FXs etc) well in advance. And I just learned what a pleasure a moleskin notebook can be in my pocket. I bought 3 for this current project I'm on. Still just on the first one, but jotting down things as time passes is quite important (and a documentary on 35mm film might be a bit insane...)
  • 0

#9 Zach Lipovsky

Zach Lipovsky

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Director

Posted 31 July 2012 - 01:09 AM

Hi,

Thought I'd add a message about an awesome app for shot listing that I designed. It's called Shot Lister and is available for the ipad or iphone in the app store. It's the only truly professionally app designed for shot listing. Helps you build, organize, schedule and share shots with a flick of a finger. Hope you find it really useful.

www.shotlister.com

Let me know if you have any questions about it.
  • 0






Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

Cadrage Directors Viewfinder

Cinelicious

Ritter Battery

System Associates

Zylight

rebotnix Technologies

Lemo Connectors

Visual Products

Glidecam

Cool Lights

CineLab

The Slider

CineTape

Robert Starling

Pro 8mm

K5600 Lighting

Paralinx LLC

K5600 Lighting

The Slider

CineLab

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Zylight

Paralinx LLC

Cinelicious

Robert Starling

Cadrage Directors Viewfinder

Glidecam

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Cool Lights

Pro 8mm

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

System Associates

Lemo Connectors