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What is the "correct" angle for using L.C.D. screen


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#1 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 28 January 2007 - 11:45 AM

This is from a post on another thread:


"The Panasonic HVX 200 is rated at 320 ASA. So for night construction scenes you will have to pump in quite a bit of light. But fortunately for you, i think there will ba alot of places to hide lights in a construction set right? Aslo make sure you dont shoot the camera wide open. f2-f2.8 would be desirable. I have shot wide open on this camera in low light situations, and the blacks come out milky, and grainy. Not the effect i was after in that situation. Another side note, when shooting dark scenes, it's a good idea for you to shoot looking through the eye piece rather than the flip screen. The viewing angle of the flip screen is very narrow, and you will be looking at the image with the wrong exposure if the screen angle is not exact. A way around this is to look through the eye piece.

a while ago when i was shooting with this camera, i was shooting the NTSC version (in singapore that shoots PAL). I noticed the kino pulsing. This is easily fixed in camera."


I haven't been able to get an answer there to this question: Is there a correct angle for
viewing at which the L.C.D. is most accurate? I'm usually above it a bit but it certainly looks
different from different angles. I often do not have a production monitor and do not use the
eye piece.

Also, does anybody know about the second comment and exactly how to fix pulsing lights in
camera? Thanks!
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#2 J Costantini

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Posted 28 January 2007 - 05:48 PM

You could try to change the shutter speed...

if you're running at 24P try using 1/60 shutter instead of 1/48 (normal).
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#3 Michael Nash

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Posted 28 January 2007 - 05:54 PM

The easiest way to find the correct viewing angle for an LCD is to use the black PLUGE on color bars. Those are the three little dark gray (near black) rectangles on the lower right. If your camera is set up to use a master black value of 0IRE, you should be able to see all three black chips. Adjust the viewing angle until you find the "sweet spot" where the chip on the left gets as dark as it can, but you can still see the chip in the middle.

screenshot3.jpeg

(NOTE: This is for cameras using 0 IRE setup. For proper adjustment of monitors when using 7.5 IRE setup, check here: http://www.videouniv...com/tvbars2.htm )

As for the pulsing fluorescents, you need to shoot with a shutterspeed of 1/50 sec., not 1/48, when shooting 24fps and 50Hz. lighting. If you're using the shutter angle feature, set it to 172.8 instead of 180.

You shouldn't see any pulsing or flicker from Kino-flos, though. They use high-frequency ballasts to avoid flicker issues. I suspect you mean practical fluorescents, which flicker at the frequency of the power supply (apparently 50Hz. in Singapore; 60 Hz. in the US).
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#4 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 09:04 AM

You could try to change the shutter speed...

if you're running at 24P try using 1/60 shutter instead of 1/48 (normal).


Thanks, I think that's the right track because I realize that it's likely a frequency issue so
refining it slightly to work with 50 HZ makes sense.


The easiest way to find the correct viewing angle for an LCD is to use the black PLUGE on color bars. Those are the three little dark gray (near black) rectangles on the lower right. If your camera is set up to use a master black value of 0IRE, you should be able to see all three black chips. Adjust the viewing angle until you find the "sweet spot" where the chip on the left gets as dark as it can, but you can still see the chip in the middle.

screenshot3.jpeg

(NOTE: This is for cameras using 0 IRE setup. For proper adjustment of monitors when using 7.5 IRE setup, check here: http://www.videouniv...com/tvbars2.htm )

As for the pulsing fluorescents, you need to shoot with a shutterspeed of 1/50 sec., not 1/48, when shooting 24fps and 50Hz. lighting. If you're using the shutter angle feature, set it to 172.8 instead of 180.

You shouldn't see any pulsing or flicker from Kino-flos, though. They use high-frequency ballasts to avoid flicker issues. I suspect you mean practical fluorescents, which flicker at the frequency of the power supply (apparently 50Hz. in Singapore; 60 Hz. in the US).


Thanks, that's a big, big help. I had one other suggestion (off-forum) relating to the pluge
bars (although not explaining which ones they are like you did) but saying that I should go
into the camera and adjust the bars, which I didn't want to do (and then wouldn't I still have
to have known what angle to be looking at the monitor to do so if I still were without a
production monitor (which I also would have to set up...!)

Tilting the monitor until seeing what you the right display looks like (thanks a lot for
including the right and wrong examples) is exactly what I was hoping to know. In this
case, the camera is set to 0 IRE for black level but the link is great for reading about 7.5
set-up.

Yes, that makes sense about Kinos. Maybe for some people it's becoming a generic phrase
for flouorescents. The 1/50 or 172.8 is perfect.
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