Jump to content


Photo

PL mount, Bayonet mount, tie down


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 william koon

william koon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Student

Posted 29 January 2007 - 09:47 PM

Can somebody help to explain PL mount and Bayonet mount for zoom lens? What is 'tie down' which I found in equipment list? Thx
  • 0

#2 Delorme Jean-Marie

Delorme Jean-Marie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 513 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • paris, france

Posted 10 February 2007 - 07:52 PM

pl mount is for non panavision lens on a cam or bc mount.
mostly zeiss and angenieux pl works with arri cams vs pana
  • 0

#3 Jon Kukla

Jon Kukla
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 399 posts
  • Other

Posted 10 February 2007 - 08:02 PM

I don't understand what you mean by "tie down".

Both the Bayonet and the PL mount were developed by Arri; bayonet was designed to more securely hold a lens than the Arri standard mount, and the PL mount was designed to hold newer, heavier lenses more securely than the bayonet mount.

In the pro world, the PL mount tends to dominate cameras/lenses outside of Panavision (who have their own mount).

See http://en.wikipedia....ki/Arri_bayonet and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arri_PL for more info.
  • 0

#4 william koon

william koon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Student

Posted 25 February 2007 - 12:56 AM

I don't understand what you mean by "tie down".

Both the Bayonet and the PL mount were developed by Arri; bayonet was designed to more securely hold a lens than the Arri standard mount, and the PL mount was designed to hold newer, heavier lenses more securely than the bayonet mount.

In the pro world, the PL mount tends to dominate cameras/lenses outside of Panavision (who have their own mount).

See http://en.wikipedia....ki/Arri_bayonet and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arri_PL for more info.

Thx Jon kukla. I got a rough idea from your help. Wonder if you can show me some pictures. Anyway, I too don't understand what 'tie down' is. I got it from a list of equipment provided by grip renting store.
  • 0

#5 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 25 February 2007 - 01:23 AM

Tie Downs (aka sliding base tray screws)

example: http://cinemasupplie...1catiedosc.html

They probably included it in the equipment report because they do get lost easily and do cost money to replace.
  • 0

#6 william koon

william koon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Student

Posted 04 March 2007 - 02:07 AM

Tie Downs (aka sliding base tray screws)

example: http://cinemasupplie...1catiedosc.html

They probably included it in the equipment report because they do get lost easily and do cost money to replace.

Thank your Jonathan for the trouble. I appreciate it.
  • 0

#7 Jon Kukla

Jon Kukla
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 399 posts
  • Other

Posted 04 March 2007 - 03:11 PM

Here is a picture of a PL mount adapter, which shows you the basic design.

It's composed of a four-pronged flange, of which at least one will have a notch in the middle. I've seen one, two, and four notched PLs. Four is of course the most versatile, since you have that many different positions to mount the lens, depending on your requirements or tastes. Most modern lenses have four notches. The PL mount of the camera will have a small locating pin 45 degrees clockwise of the 12 o'clock position, which you need to align one of the notches to in order to seat the lens. This means that the flange prongs mount at a 45 degree angle to the normal X-Y axis.

I unfortunately couldn't find a good picture of a PV mount lens, but it's simple to describe. It is also a four-pronged flange, but instead of notches it has a single locating pin protruding out of one of the flange prongs. The PV camera mount seating has a single hole directly below the lens port to which this fits. Therefore the PV mount prongs are oriented like a standard X-Y axis. This design is intentional in order to make it impossible to seat an anamorphic lens at the wrong angle. The PL mount is more flexible than the PV, largely by virtue of most PL lenses being spherical, and thus will give the same image at any angle of axial rotation.

The other major differences are the flange diameter and the flange focal depth.
  • 0

#8 william koon

william koon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Student

Posted 05 March 2007 - 10:26 PM

Here is a picture of a PL mount adapter, which shows you the basic design.

It's composed of a four-pronged flange, of which at least one will have a notch in the middle. I've seen one, two, and four notched PLs. Four is of course the most versatile, since you have that many different positions to mount the lens, depending on your requirements or tastes. Most modern lenses have four notches. The PL mount of the camera will have a small locating pin 45 degrees clockwise of the 12 o'clock position, which you need to align one of the notches to in order to seat the lens. This means that the flange prongs mount at a 45 degree angle to the normal X-Y axis.

I unfortunately couldn't find a good picture of a PV mount lens, but it's simple to describe. It is also a four-pronged flange, but instead of notches it has a single locating pin protruding out of one of the flange prongs. The PV camera mount seating has a single hole directly below the lens port to which this fits. Therefore the PV mount prongs are oriented like a standard X-Y axis. This design is intentional in order to make it impossible to seat an anamorphic lens at the wrong angle. The PL mount is more flexible than the PV, largely by virtue of most PL lenses being spherical, and thus will give the same image at any angle of axial rotation.

The other major differences are the flange diameter and the flange focal depth.

Hi Jon Kukla,
Thank you so much for the trouble to post the picture. I got it and cheers
  • 0


Ritter Battery

Opal

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Opal

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc