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Please, Light Meter Recomendation


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#1 Juan Guajardo

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 11:56 AM

I decided to buy a light meter finally and i was about to buy the Sekonic L-558Cine and then i notice of a new version the L-758Cine on ebay, please anybody know if this new one is better.

What you think is best for film and digital cinematography.

Thanks.
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 01:17 PM

...please anybody know if this new one is better.


As David Mullen, a frequent poster on this site says, it's not a question of what meter is "better".

Light meters are a preferencial decision. If the 758 has features on it that the 558 doesn't, and you actually plan on using those features, then by all means get the 758. All light meters are good, you just have to understand YOUR meter in relation to the stock you're shooting on.

For instance, I just bought a Spectra IV for a much cheaper price than I would have paid for a IV-A. I could have sprung for the IV-A, but I had no intentions of using its Averaging/Contrast Ratio feature.
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#3 David Sweetman

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 02:43 PM

I don't know what new features the 758C has, but I've got the 558C, and I find it tells me more than enough about the light as it is. I've used it for both film and digital cinematography and have no complaints, however I bought it new and it was very expensive, if I were to do it again I think I'd buy two used separate meters. But I find the 558 perfect because I usually wear dickies pants and it fits snugly in the cell-phone pocket.
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#4 Daniel Carruthers

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 03:26 PM

I own a Sekonic-L 358. Works fine for me. and only 300$ canadian
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#5 Jan Weis

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 03:37 PM

I dont think you should waste your money on an expensive light meter just yet,
I made a lightmeter a couple of months ago, it was cheap it works accurately
(or acurately enough).

heres the link:
http://www.cinematog...mp;#entry152078

Edited by Jan Weis, 01 February 2007 - 03:39 PM.

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#6 Mitch Lusas

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 12:59 AM

Ditto on the 558. I'm a huge fan of the reflective/incident. It manages a lot of calculations, and is sometimes called a Light Computer. Battery life is decent, just order the batteries in bulk off the internet. Otherwise, you'll be in trouble with high costs at stores, and in danger of running out during a long shoot. Although it's always nice to have one of the old Sekonic incidents floating around; they're cheap tanks.

You can get the European model cheaper. You just can't use to the Radio Wizard with it. No-biggy.
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#7 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 11:07 AM

I don't know what new features the 758C has, but I've got the 558C, and I find it tells me more than enough about the light as it is. I've used it for both film and digital cinematography and have no complaints, however I bought it new and it was very expensive, if I were to do it again I think I'd buy two used separate meters. But I find the 558 perfect because I usually wear dickies pants and it fits snugly in the cell-phone pocket.

Regarding the photo here, if Kiefer wants to post on here I'm sure he's welcome but he should sign
up!

Seriously, that must be a blast getting paid to watch them shoot !

I decided to buy a light meter finally and i was about to buy the Sekonic L-558Cine and then i notice of a new version the L-758Cine on ebay, please anybody know if this new one is better.

What you think is best for film and digital cinematography.

Thanks.


Juan, in many cities there are photography shops that sell refurbished light meters,
including cine meters, for great savings with decent guarantees. Usually they got
them when somebody decided to trdae up but they often have all kinds.

A friend got a 3 temperature color meter for $500.00 that was worth more than twice that
and it works great. Sekonics are usually 40% off new prices and they're good if you find a
good shop. Good luck!
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#8 Juan Guajardo

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 01:55 PM

Thanks All.

Edited by Juan Guajardo, 02 February 2007 - 01:55 PM.

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#9 Daniel Smith

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Posted 10 April 2007 - 05:19 PM

Sorry to ressurect this old thread, but it's better than making a new one.

I'm also now looking to buy a light metre and wanted to know what one to get, either the Sekonic L-398a or the Sekonic L-308s.

Both do movie, but I'm wondering which would be the better choice.

Thanks!
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#10 David Bradley

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Posted 10 April 2007 - 06:53 PM

I'm a fan of analog light meters and for the price £80-£100 retail you can't really complain much about the Sekonic L-398A. Having said that both meters have a cine function as well as still function, they have a very marginal price difference though you may prefer a digital readout.

Sekonic L-398A:

Measuring Range (ISO 100)

Ambient light: Incident light: EV 4 to EV 17
Reflected light: EV 9 to EV 17
Repeat Accuracy: +/- 0.3 EV or less
Calibration Constant: Incident light metering: Lumisphere C = 340
Reflected light metering: K = 12.5


Display Range

Film speed:

ISO 6 to 12000 (in 1/3 steps)
Shutter Speeds: Ambient light: 60 seconds to 1/8000 second (in 1, 1/2 or 1/3 stop)
Cine speeds: 8, 16, 18, 24, 64, 128 frames per second
Aperture: f/0.7 to f/128 (in 1, 1/2 or 1/3 stop)
Light Receptors EV 1 to EV 20

L-308S FLASHMATE

Measuring Range (ISO 100)
Ambient light: Incident light EV 0 to EV 19.9
Reflected light EV 0 to EV 19.9 (with 40° Lumigrid)
Flash: Incident light f/1.4 to f/90.9 (approx. f/124)
Reflected light f/1.4 to f/90.9 (approx. f/124) with 40° Lumigrid
Repeat Accuracy: +/- 0.1 EV or less

Calibration Constant
Incident light metering:Lumisphere C = 340 Lumidisc C = 250
Reflected light metering: K = 12.5


Display Range

Film speed: ISO 3 to 8000 (in 1/3 steps)
Shutter Speeds Ambient light: 60 seconds to 1/8000 seconds (in 1, 1/2 or 1/3 stop) also 1/200, 1/400
Cine speeds: 8, 12, 16, 18, 24, 25, 30, 32, 64, 128 frames per second (at a 180 degree shutter angle)
Flash: 1 to 1/500 second (in 1, 1/2 or 1/3 stop) also 1/75, 1/80, 1/90, 1/100
Aperture: f/0.5 to f/90.9 (in 1, 1/2 or 1/3 stop)
EV: EV -5 to EV 26.2 (in 1/10 stop)

All above attained from sekonic.com

As you can see the L-308S is far more sensitive so it would appear to be the obvious choice.
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#11 Daniel Smith

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Posted 10 April 2007 - 07:07 PM

Ok thanks.

(I was kind of hoping for the L-398s to be more accurate... it just looks so retro..)
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