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How to achieve this sky


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#1 Rob Wilton

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 12:04 PM

Dear all,
Im lighting a hut interior, and would love to get a dark blue sky like in this picture.
How was it achieved? Filtration, right time/right place, grading?
Thanks for your help!

Rob Wilton
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 01:24 PM

Hi,

Which picture?

Common techniques for darkening skies include polarising and graduated filters. Look up some information on those then ask more here.

Phil
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#3 Rob Wilton

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 06:09 PM

cap014.jpg

Dear Phil,
sorry my credit ran out and the file was too big, here a second attempt...
the pic is from the beautiful film The New World
Rob
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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 08:09 PM

Hi,

I think you'll find that's just dark because it's evening - magic hour, probably.

Phil
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#5 Chris Keth

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 08:11 PM

Hi,

I think you'll find that's just dark because it's evening - magic hour, probably.

Phil


Bingo. This look is all timing. It's after sunset but before it's actually entirely dark.
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#6 Zamir Merali

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 08:45 PM

You could try to use a blue grad filter. The filter stars out blue on the top and then gradually changes to clear on the bottom. It would make the sky dark blue but anything under the middle part of the frame would be natural colour. YOu cant move the camera too much but it would do the trick.

Another thing you could do would be to key the light blue sky out and replace it with a darker sky. This would be complex because you would need to track the footage and may need to do some roto.

Zamir Merali
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#7 Mike Rizos

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 09:09 PM

I think a dark blue sky look can be achieved in bright sunlight, by pola filter shooting 90 degrees to the sun, and slight underexposure.
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#8 Joseph Winchester

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 12:30 AM

You could replicate this by shooting with tungsten film at dusk. The fire light is a lower temp than tungsten lights, so it will appear yellow as seen. The sky will come out a nice rich blue, since the film is balanced for yellow light.

This is a common trick when shooting interiors of houses and buildings with windows showing dusk light. Very simple, actually.

Edited by Joseph Waingezheyaw, 05 February 2007 - 12:32 AM.

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#9 deniss huifeng li

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 08:47 AM

Josphe is right
usually we use TUN film take night effects in daylight or magic hour
you can filter the TUN light with 1/2 CTO
blue filter is not good choice
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#10 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 03:10 AM

Rent a big soundstage with a cyc and dim the lights way down :D

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 08 February 2007 - 03:11 AM.

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#11 Jon Kukla

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 07:54 PM

I suppose in theory you could use a cool DFN filter (Tiffen makes them). But if you aren't doing too many setups, why not just shoot the real thing, as everyone else seems to suggest?
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Visual Products

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Technodolly