Jump to content


Photo

Everything a good grip should know?


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 grahamstanly

grahamstanly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 80 posts
  • Student

Posted 07 February 2007 - 09:13 PM

Ok I have looked for the answer to this for a while, and I am a bit lost as to the tasks a grip has. and the equipment a good grip should have or be comfortable using.

first I would like to know the main tasks of a grip, on a movie set, and the set for a TV show, like the news.


second, I would like to know what equipment a good grip should own, or know how to use.


and third, I would love to know how an average grip job would pay. i know it changes with the type of job, so lets say the pay for a TV grip, a film grip, and a News grip.

I want to know these things because I am exploring my options for a job in the industry someday. and I want to know about all of the main jobs. So really any light you want to shed on the subject is appriciated.

Thank you very much for any and all comments!
  • 0

#2 David Auner aac

David Auner aac
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 09 February 2007 - 02:03 PM

Ok I have looked for the answer to this for a while, and I am a bit lost as to the tasks a grip has. and the equipment a good grip should have or be comfortable using.
[snip]

Thank you very much for any and all comments!


Hi Graham!

Just do a quick search on Amazon for Michael Uva and grab one of his books. They are an excellent starting point! Then try to get a job on a set...

Cheers, Dave
  • 0

#3 grahamstanly

grahamstanly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 80 posts
  • Student

Posted 09 February 2007 - 06:58 PM

great tips david, but I think i am a bit to young to work on a movie set I am still a senior in Hs so it might be a while but i will check out that book
  • 0

#4 David Auner aac

David Auner aac
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 10 February 2007 - 05:08 AM

great tips david, but I think i am a bit to young to work on a movie set I am still a senior in Hs so it might be a while but i will check out that book


Well, to tell you the truth, if you can lift & carry stuff and have some time to spare why not get an early start? If there's some college offering film classes close to where you live you could post a note on the bulletin board that you'd volunteer as assistant grip. That might get you started. Just tell them you have no experience but are willing to learn!

Cheers, Dave
  • 0

#5 Brian Baker

Brian Baker
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts
  • Student

Posted 10 February 2007 - 11:09 PM

... volunteer as assistant grip. That might get you started. Just tell them you have no experience but are willing to learn!


I honestly wish I'd done stuff like this before going to film school.

Good advice to take.
  • 0

#6 Chris Soreide

Chris Soreide

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Student

Posted 12 February 2007 - 01:46 PM

Yupp, It's really true what is said here. You will learn so much different stuff that you would never learn in a film school and the more productions you encounter, the more grips/gaffers do you meet and trust me, everyone work differently so you always learn something.

Remember though, be very humble when going in as a Jr. grip for the first time. Always do what they ask you to do and don't try to do anyting big without being told so. Irritating the gaffer on the first day is a bad start :)

Prepare youself for endless hours of roling extention cables and fixing the C-stands, at least what I did on my first locations shoots.
  • 0

#7 grahamstanly

grahamstanly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 80 posts
  • Student

Posted 18 February 2007 - 10:30 PM

well i do have a bit of a start. I am a grip for my church they make a lot movies and do a lot of live broadcasts. its a ton of fun and a lot of work but yea I will try and see if somone will let me help out on set.
thanks for all of the tips.

Edited by grahamstanly, 18 February 2007 - 10:32 PM.

  • 0

#8 brian hendry

brian hendry
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • Grip
  • NC/VA

Posted 20 February 2007 - 07:00 PM

well im a grip for a living. im mostly a 3rd, and time to time im a best boy and a key on smaller stuff.

a grip, we shape and diffuse the light, any and all things that dont plug in really, we also do the rigging on set, set points for lights to hang , make things safe, rig back drops and green screens, pulleys and trusses and so on. ummm, as for basic equipment you should know...everything about a c-stand you can learn, 6x's to 20x's , cutters, and loads of other crap....just learn it all.

as for pay. you can make a good living as a grip....commercial rate is usually somewhere around 350 for 10 or 425 for 12 hours.....but if your starting out, you wont get rates like that, hop on some indie features, make around 215 a day for 12 and so on. between the rate, the overtime , the perdiem and everything else paid for like hotels and rental cars and so on, you can make a bunch...i just got off a 5 month feature, and yea....im gonna take a long long break. making 280 a day 6 days a week for 5 months. do the math.
  • 0

#9 Chad Stockfleth

Chad Stockfleth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 622 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Louisville, KY

Posted 20 February 2007 - 07:14 PM

and god bless you guys. i've gripped before, mostly i direct and dp (at the same time :blink: ), but what you guys do is always amazing to me. the ones who really specialize in gripping (not your random hands) are like engineers, sailors and code enforcement officials all rolled into one. i've seen cribbing built for a dolly that's so architecturally thought out you really feel bad about having to break it down.

it's a tough, physical job that doesn't get all the respect it deserves, but it's honest, challenging work and the ones who do it well are worth the money.

kudos to grips everywhere!

:D
  • 0

#10 grahamstanly

grahamstanly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 80 posts
  • Student

Posted 20 February 2007 - 11:36 PM

whats the difference between a best boy and grip? and also i give kudos to grips they are tough stuff!
  • 0

#11 Michael Palm

Michael Palm
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Student
  • Kansas City, MO USA

Posted 01 March 2007 - 07:19 PM

Hey Graham,

I was in the same situation as you. My friend was acting in a film and the production needed grips. So I decided why not?
I am honestly very happy I made that big step, you learn the most just by working with a crew.

Now I am Film major at Savannah College of Art and Design, and learning 24/7.

So go in with a good attitude. Work hard.
  • 0

#12 David Erlichman

David Erlichman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 49 posts
  • Grip
  • Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Posted 01 March 2007 - 10:22 PM

whats the difference between a best boy and grip?


Key Grip
Best Boy Grip
Dolly Grip
Grip

The Best Boy Grip is the second in command and organizer of gear and crew.

Dave

Edited by David Erlichman, 01 March 2007 - 10:23 PM.

  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Visual Products

The Slider

CineLab

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Opal

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

CineTape

Tai Audio