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How "bout this one-Film vs. Videogames


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 03:25 AM

Are videogames going to eventually replace narritive movies? Are the eqilvelant of Star Trek's halo-decks the future replacement for theaters after all, why watch a movie when you can live one? It's a question I've had on my mind (and frankly has sorta bothered me) for a while, every sense I found out videogames are outpacing movies in sales and NOW almost all successful movies become videogames. Opinions?

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 08 February 2007 - 03:27 AM.

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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 07:29 AM

Hi,

I wrote a large part of my degree thesis on exactly this subject. It's a straightforward example of convergence, and I think that as computer game graphics get more realistic (and, frankly, as big movies rely more and more on unrealistic CG) there will increasingly be overlap.

I mean, if I'm going to put up with it looking unrealistic, I may as well have interactivity, eh?

Phil
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#3 Keneu Luca

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 07:40 AM

Are videogames going to eventually replace narritive movies?


No.

Regardless of their (video games) popularity and demand, there will always be people who want to make films and only films.

And this seems genre specific. It seems that video games would only interfere and compete with sports and action films. Although yes, Im sure there have been video games based on dramas and dramadies. Quite the exception.

IF you really really think about it, the idea of video games eliminating narative films as we know them is absurd. I suspect the topic was brought up only to spark discussion about the various aspects of video games versus films, and not actually the reality of video games causing the extinction of film.

Come on. Really.

Back to games based on dramas and dramadies...Id like to see a Woody Allen game. Or Robert Altman.:D

Wait...I think Atari did have a M*A*S*H* game. But was it based on the film or the TV show?

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Edited by Keneu Luca, 08 February 2007 - 07:45 AM.

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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 08:55 AM

Hi,

> Regardless of their (video games) popularity and demand, there will always be people who want to make
> films and only films.

I disagree. What gets made is not determined by what people want to make; it's controlled by what the audience is willing to pay to see.

That might make the same point in a different way, of course, and I also think it's likely that there will always be a forum for noninteractive screen entertainment, just as books show no sign of going out of fashion. I expect to see even closer convergence, though, even if that's measured by nothing more than computer games becoming ever more realistic. The realism of the graphical presentation of these things has been demanding film-style design and production techniques for the best part of a decade.

Tell me this isn't cinematography:

Posted Image

Phil
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#5 Troy Warr

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 09:24 AM

In my opinion, people don't always want to have interactive experiences when it comes to entertainment. Daily life is as interactive as it gets, and I think that part of the magic of movies is that you can withdraw from your own personal vantage point and experience that of another character. Even though you often "play" another character in video games, you're still the one in control, making the decisions behind the scenes. While that's certainly entertaining, I, for one, like to occasionally take a break from myself and watch a good movie. I can't get that same experience with video games.
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#6 Lance Flores

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 10:12 AM

In my opinion, people don't always want to have interactive experiences when it comes to entertainment. <snip>


Oh Troy .. that's only because their waiting for About Schmidt and Lost in Translation interactive video.
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#7 Keneu Luca

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 10:12 AM

I disagree. What gets made is not determined by what people want to make; it's controlled by what the audience is willing to pay to see.


Actually, what gets made is determined by what people want to make. People are free to pursue whatever career/hobby they want, wether they profit by it or not.

And sometimes what people want to make is also what other people want to watch. This will continue to happen for both narrative film and video games. There are waaaaay too many people in the world. They're not all going to eventually forefit narrative film in favor of video games, making or watching them.

Formats may change, the process may change, venues may change, but narrative film will always be there. As long as a means of making motion pictures exists, wether it's through a camera or completey through a computer, narrative films will always be there.

Do you honestly think it's possible that narrative film will be replaced by video games? Even if you ignore everything else I've just written, at least answer this question.

Like I said in my first post, I suspect the topic was brought up only to spark discussion about the various aspects of video games versus films, and not actually the reality of video games causing the extinction of film.
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#8 Mike Panczenko

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 10:37 AM

I think there will probably be a prevalence of both interactive movies in the future, along with traditional narrative film. Audiences don't always want interactivity- we have choose your own adventure books and we have narrative literature which has been one of the staples of human culture. While I think the visual medium may be better suited to interactivity than literature, I don't think traditional narrative film will ever die out. I suspect there will be room for both when the technology catches up to the idea.
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#9 Chris Durham

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 11:07 AM

I'm not sure that the video games outpacing movies is an altogether accurate representation. I don't have numbers and am not really sure where to get them, so please point out where I might be incorrect. While video games likely outsell movies in terms of dollars, that doesn't necessarily indicate a higher demand for video games. For one thing your average video game costs $50. If I don't eat popcorn I can go to the movies 6 times for that much money. 8 if I go to a matinee. I can buy 2 1/2 new DVDs or 3-4 used ones. I can watch negative infinity to infinity shows or movies on TV, depending on how advertisement sways my spending habits. And let's not forget that the more popular and more interactive games such as WoW require a month-to-month fee; however that's equatable to cable or satellite in the narrative world, so call it a wash. Point is that the fact that games are beating movies in hard dollars no way indicates a diminishment of the demand for film. It just indicates that interactive storytelling is just as viable a method of expression and entertainment as is narrative storytelling. Games won't replace movies any more than movies replaced books. We will see movies based on video games, books based on movies, video games based on books, etc.. Oh wait, that sort of thing has already happened. Yay Alone in the Dark.
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#10 John Holland

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 12:43 PM

Hi,

> Regardless of their (video games) popularity and demand, there will always be people who want to make
> films and only films.

I disagree. What gets made is not determined by what people want to make; it's controlled by what the audience is willing to pay to see.

That might make the same point in a different way, of course, and I also think it's likely that there will always be a forum for noninteractive screen entertainment, just as books show no sign of going out of fashion. I expect to see even closer convergence, though, even if that's measured by nothing more than computer games becoming ever more realistic. The realism of the graphical presentation of these things has been demanding film-style design and production techniques for the best part of a decade.

Tell me this isn't cinematography:

Posted Image

Phil



Sorry Phil . cock up there. i think that is Production Design , not Cinematography, but i do understand where you are coming from .
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#11 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 12:45 PM

I've never been impressed by the performance of a digital character.

Real live actors will never be replaced so long as film is a performance art.
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#12 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 01:27 PM

Hi,

Well, it's a still from video. It's a moving image which has been lit; lenses have been chosen, framing and camera position, all using the same criteria that are used for real world stuff.

Phil
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#13 Troy Warr

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 01:28 PM

Oh Troy .. that's only because their waiting for About Schmidt and Lost in Translation interactive video.

Hahaha... or how about a Remains of the Day first-person shooter game? :P
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#14 Joe Walker

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 02:06 PM

I normally don't post a whole lot but this subject really got me going. I can't agree more with Phil. Phil, I think you are spot on. In every way. I think it's all about interactivity. No, there will never be a "Lost in Translation", or "Remains of the Day" video game. That's absurd. What Phil is implying (and Phil chime in if I'm dead wrong here), is that as far as an entertainment venue, the fully interactive virtual reality styled action video game that places YOU in the first person lead character element, where YOU determine how the story ends, and YOU make all of the huge decisions that will ultimately lead to Earth being saved, is going to eventually eclipse the movie playing on the screen of the same storyline that is primarily dictated to you. Artists will continue to make drama/comedy/horror/etc films. That won't change at all. Just because a camera was invented didn't stop people from painting. Just because a motion picture camera was invented didn't stop people from taking stills. Just because interactive video games are now here, doesn't mean that people will stop making films. I don't believe that was ever implied. I believe what is implied is that as a commercial venue, (i.e. a way to make large scale profits off of entertainment) video games will eventually surpass movies as the primary way to make lots of money from an entertainment venue. I believe that films have been/are now/will continue to be a very important artistic medium, just as the still image, the painting, the sculpture, the poem, the song, and the story have been. I love film. I love all types of films (drama/comedy/horror/documentary/etc). I think that down the road, even after the fact, people will still be able to make a living off of making films. That won't change either. But as far as making huge/massive/large scale profits, I do believe that the fully interactive video game will one day be the top money-maker. Just my two cents. Fire at will.
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