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Rating 7265


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#1 David Sweetman

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 03:01 AM

I'm doing a film test tomorrow for a short film shooting in a few weeks. It's on 7265 (b/w reversal), however we may shoot at night. I realize we should use 7266 for the extra speed, but tomorrow we're testing '65. We'll probably test during the day, at magic hour, at dusk, and at night, but will only use one setting for the film. I'd love to shoot at night because I really want to make use of shadow and contrast.

Anyway, how should I rate this stock, processed normally? The Kodak website says Tungsten, 80, and Daylight 100. Does that mean shooting at night in tungsten light I'd rate it at 80? And why does it need more tungsten than daylight?
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#2 Elliot Rudmann

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 03:31 AM

Anyway, how should I rate this stock, processed normally? The Kodak website says Tungsten, 80, and Daylight 100. Does that mean shooting at night in tungsten light I'd rate it at 80? And why does it need more tungsten than daylight?


Go by the rules and rate the '65 at ISO 80 if you're shooting it under tungsten lights (even at night), just be very cautious about overexposing, as it only has about a 1/2 stop tolerance for overexposure before you simply lose information in the whites. Given my experience, I really like the smoothness and look of plus x over tri x, but for night, I really would consider shooting Tri-X when it comes to the actual shoot - this extra stop of light you would gain using '66 can be really helpful, especially if you aren't using powerful lights. It will make things a lot easier for you.

The reason why those reversal stocks need that extra 1/3 stop of light is because the film is less sensitive to the color red, and the tungsten filament in the bulbs output a higher spectrum of red then daylight does. Someone else could probably explain this better than I can.
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#3 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 03:39 AM

I'm doing a film test tomorrow for a short film shooting in a few weeks. It's on 7265 (b/w reversal), however we may shoot at night. I realize we should use 7266 for the extra speed, but tomorrow we're testing '65. We'll probably test during the day, at magic hour, at dusk, and at night, but will only use one setting for the film. I'd love to shoot at night because I really want to make use of shadow and contrast.

Anyway, how should I rate this stock, processed normally? The Kodak website says Tungsten, 80, and Daylight 100. Does that mean shooting at night in tungsten light I'd rate it at 80? And why does it need more tungsten than daylight?

Hi David,

I haven't shot with 7265 yet, but I have shot a lot of 7266. I would start by rating the Plus-X at 80 ASA, and then bracket the exposures by 1/2 stop and 1 stop in either direction for the test. If you're shooting at night with existing light, you'll probably need to shoot with Tri-X, though. You might try using fast lenses like the Superspeeds and shooting at lower frame rates (16 fps, 12 fps, etc.) for MOS shots to increase exposure. By the way, 7266 is not nearly as grainy as its negative counterpart 7222, Double X -- you might be surprised at how fine-grained it can look.

You might also want to try shooting day-for-night with colored filters to darken the sky. Usually, a #25 filter (Red) will turn a blue sky to dark grey. Combined with underexposure, you can make blue skies appear black, while still shooting in broad daylight. A #25 filter loses 3 stops.

B&W panchromatic film (like 7265 and 7266) is more sensitive to bluish light (~5500K) than to red (~3200K), so you need to rate it differently to get the same exposure.

Hope this helps!
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