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7240 mixed with modern stocks


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#1 Richardson Leao

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 10:49 PM

Hi all,

I have 240m of 7240 that I wanna use in a new project and I wonder if I could 'mix' it with modern negative stocks. If so, what should I use? Could I do bleach BP on the neg stock to increase the contrast to mix with the old 7240? Many thanks
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#2 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 03:39 PM

Hi all,

I have 240m of 7240 that I wanna use in a new project and I wonder if I could 'mix' it with modern negative stocks. If so, what should I use? Could I do bleach BP on the neg stock to increase the contrast to mix with the old 7240? Many thanks


That's Ektachrome VNF reversal.

Ifit's all video finish you'd have to adjust negative stock contrast to try to match.

Film finish forget it.

Edited by Leo Anthony Vale, 12 February 2007 - 03:41 PM.

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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 05:14 PM

VNF reversal.


Hi.

What exactly is VNF Reversal?

Thanks. ;)
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 06:35 PM

VNF was a line of Ektachrome color reversal stocks that Kodak introduced in the 1970's with their own reversal process (also called VNF). Stands for "Video News Film" since this was in the waning days when 16mm was used for shooting the news and getting it quickly processed at the TV station lab and put on the air.

Compared to modern E6 processed Ektachrome stocks like 7285 (100D), these old stocks were somewhat soft, grainy, and not particularly saturated. A good example is the movie "Buffalo 66", shot in the only 35mm VNF Ektachrome stock and processed normally (not cross-processed into a negative). They had to make a dupe negative for printing in an optical printer, and flashed it in order to bring the contrast down to something manageable.

Kodak obsoleted the VNF line recently, partly because some of the chemicals used in VNF were not considered environmentally friendly. And it was an old technology compared to E6. If only Kodak had come out with an E6 line-up to replace the VNF line-up, for the few people that want to shoot reversal. Right now there is just 100D, but two tungsten-balanced stocks, one fast and one slow, would be useful to complete the set. Well, I guess E64T falls under that category but it isn't the greatest of E6 stocks...
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#5 Matthew Buick

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 06:45 PM

Wow, that's a fantasticly detailed answer, just the initials would have done. :)

Thanks very much. ;)
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