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time lapse from a window with existing light


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#1 Sandra Lim

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 06:40 AM

Hi there,

I have a filming situation which has a lot of different existing light variables. I am filming a time lapse day to night shot with the camera about three feet from the inside of a window so it gets a bit of the interior and a lot of the exterior setting.

I was wondering if anyone would have the experience of choosing a film stock for a situation in which you have to take into account the existing light which is natural from a window, the existing light of the room with over head lights and also at some point there will be very little light from the window and more from the inside of the room as the outside becomes night. There are maybe more variables than I am thinking of here. Would it be best to mix film stocks? I would like to do the editing by hand and transfer the final work to DV and DVD.


Thanks,
Sandra
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#2 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 02:33 PM

Hi there,

I have a filming situation which has a lot of different existing light variables. I am filming a time lapse day to night shot with the camera about three feet from the inside of a window so it gets a bit of the interior and a lot of the exterior setting.

I was wondering if anyone would have the experience of choosing a film stock for a situation in which you have to take into account the existing light which is natural from a window, the existing light of the room with over head lights and also at some point there will be very little light from the window and more from the inside of the room as the outside becomes night. There are maybe more variables than I am thinking of here. Would it be best to mix film stocks? I would like to do the editing by hand and transfer the final work to DV and DVD.
Thanks,
Sandra


You're limiting yourself to reversal film stock because you want to hand edit it. So your choices really come down to Kodak 64T or Fuji Velvia 50. What you want to find is a camera like a Nizo 800 or 801, a Bauer Royal, or Eumig 800 series (but not the 800) that offers multiple filming speeds. The idea is you can slow down the shutter speed by switching the filming selector to a slower frame speed even if you are doing time-lapse. That will give you a bit more flexibility in terms of control over the exposure.
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#3 Sandra Lim

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 04:51 PM

You're limiting yourself to reversal film stock because you want to hand edit it. So your choices really come down to Kodak 64T or Fuji Velvia 50. What you want to find is a camera like a Nizo 800 or 801, a Bauer Royal, or Eumig 800 series (but not the 800) that offers multiple filming speeds. The idea is you can slow down the shutter speed by switching the filming selector to a slower frame speed even if you doing time-lapse. That will give you a bit more flexibility in terms of control over the exposure.


Hi Alessandro

That is very interesting information. I am just learning about film stocks, light and the camera from the ground up and will look into the filming speeds as well. I've managed to do the shot in DV sped up in FCP but the effect is quite odd and mechanical looking with little depth of definition and tons of tape, and from one tape to the next there seems to be a disjointedness, so I was trying to avoid digitizing the film. If it means I'm limited in the film stocks then maybe I have to reconsider this. I'm really trying to get as much foreground and background detail as possible from inside to out and that whole transition as fluid so maybe that is what should determine the film choice?
I will try this shot with a couple of different film speeds and see what happens too. The cameras you have mentioned maybe have a better lens from what I have read in here for this kind of thing? Wish I had one but I do have a Canon 814XL-S and/or Canon 1014e to use and no manuals for any of these cameras so it's a big experiment!
Thanks,
Sandra
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#4 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 05:40 PM

Hi Alessandro

That is very interesting information. I am just learning about film stocks, light and the camera from the ground up and will look into the filming speeds as well. I've managed to do the shot in DV sped up in FCP but the effect is quite odd and mechanical looking with little depth of definition and tons of tape, and from one tape to the next there seems to be a disjointedness, so I was trying to avoid digitizing the film. If it means I'm limited in the film stocks then maybe I have to reconsider this. I'm really trying to get as much foreground and background detail as possible from inside to out and that whole transition as fluid so maybe that is what should determine the film choice?
I will try this shot with a couple of different film speeds and see what happens too. The cameras you have mentioned maybe have a better lens from what I have read in here for this kind of thing? Wish I had one but I do have a Canon 814XL-S and/or Canon 1014e to use and no manuals for any of these cameras so it's a big experiment!
Thanks,
Sandra



Ah, now I have more information. Perhaps the Kodak Vision 200T might be the way to go. Since it is a negative film stock, once developed you will need to transfer it to digital video, at which point it would be very easy to edit because you would only have a few minutes to deal with rather than hours of video footage to speed up. The negative film stock should have nice lattitude.

Perhaps the most intriguing way to go would be to use time-exposure and a slower film stock. At night, you could do exposures of a couple of seconds. However, creating a long period of time between the time-exposures when the shutter is completely closed might be tricky.

But during the day, you could switch over to regular time-lapse mode.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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