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How turn on HMI Lamp


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#1 deng

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 01:46 PM

Asked HMI lamp turns on the light the procedure is any must first operate the Basselet or first to turn on switch

THANK YOU EVERYBODY
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#2 Matt Sandstrom

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 01:57 PM

i've been taught to switch the light on first and then the ballast, but i've no idea if this is required. it should be autosensing, but it seems like a good idea to be far away from the lamp as it strikes, should it choose to explode or leak some of that striking voltage. ;-)

so in short, i also would like the real answer to this question. thanks.

/matt
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#3 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 01:59 PM

You switch on using the small switch on the ballast, then push the button (either on the ballast or at the light head) to strike the HMI. However, very often the switch is already at the "on" position.
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#4 John Holland

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 02:02 PM

Yep Brian is correct .
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#5 Matt Sandstrom

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 02:09 PM

so the button on the light is wired back to the ballast and doesn't really "switch on" the light? i seem to remember using light heads that really had switches on them though and not just striking buttons. that would mean that both, not either, have to be in the on position to strike, no?

/matt

Edited by Matt Sandstrom, 14 February 2007 - 02:09 PM.

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#6 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 02:12 PM

You switch on using the small switch on the ballast - this is a circuit breaker, then push the big ON button (either on the ballast or at the light head - it doesn't matter) to strike the HMI. However, very often the circuit breaker switch is already at the "on" position.

With 12k and 18k HMIs you should focus the lamp at the spot position this prevents a thermal shock to the lens. (Just found this one out, since with these big HMIs the sparks do all the hands on stuff)

Edited by Brian Drysdale, 14 February 2007 - 02:14 PM.

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#7 Matt Sandstrom

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 02:24 PM

then push the big ON button (either on the ballast or at the light head - it doesn't matter) to strike the HMI.

i understand, so this button is never an on/off button, just a "push-to-strike" one? i'm not trying to argue, just trying to merge your info with my memory. ;-)

/matt
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#8 timHealy

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 02:26 PM

Some manufacturers have different types of switches.

All ballasts have a breaker of some sort. That is a given.

Some manufacturers have momentary pushbutton type switches on the ballast and the head. Either one can turn on or turn off a light. If one has trouble turning a light on or off using one switch sometimes the other will work.

Some manufacturers use a rocker type switch on the ballast and head. Or a pushbutton type switch that has two positions. In that case both switches will have to be in the on position for the light to work.

It really doesn't matter what is turned on or off first. But sometimes it is better to power up the ballast and leave the switches on and give the lamp operator the power to turn it on or off and sometimes turning a light on or off from the ballast is better like when a head may be rigged in a lift or on top of scaffolding.

Best

Tim
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#9 Matt Sandstrom

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 02:31 PM

Some manufacturers use a rocker type switch on the ballast and head. Or a pushbutton type switch that has two positions. In that case both switches will have to be in the on position for the light to work.

thanks. that's what i meant.

/matt
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#10 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 02:41 PM

so the button on the light is wired back to the ballast and doesn't really "switch on" the light? i seem to remember using light heads that really had switches on them though and not just striking buttons. that would mean that both, not either, have to be in the on position to strike, no?

/matt


Any HMIs I've seen just have the ON/OFF switches that allow you to strike on the light head. I can't really see why you'd also need a "power" switch on the light head, since you already have a circuit breaker on the ballast.

Are you thinking of a small HMI where the ballast is part of the lamp head itself?


Some manufacturers have momentary pushbutton type switches on the ballast and the head. Either one can turn on or turn off a light. If one has trouble turning a light on or off using one switch sometimes the other will work.

Some manufacturers use a rocker type switch on the ballast and head. Or a pushbutton type switch that has two positions. In that case both switches will have to be in the on position for the light to work.


Makes sense of the question about the extra switch.
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#11 Evan Pierre

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 04:45 PM

Something also very important to remember is how to switch an HMI off. Make sure to press the OFF switch on your ballast before you hit the main power breaker. This could prove dangerous and possibly could damage your lamp, also don't sit on your ballast! :)

This may not be the procedure for everyone but with our current setup this is how it works.

Edited by Evan Pierre, 16 February 2007 - 04:47 PM.

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#12 deng

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 06:50 AM

because we had two HMI 575 that LAMP is using about 500hours and 300hours
in fact ,one lamp was burn out, then we often turn on the ballast (25A-->red button on-->minman strike)
first and then push on the light head
another one is opposite steps
BUT two lamp all is broken
So i hope to know which steps turns on the light the priority
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#13 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 05:32 PM

Every HMI I have worked with has a breaker, a strike button (usually green) and a off button (red).

Also, most 12k/ 18k ballasts have an internal fuse that is for lower voltage stuff inside the ballast. If you are running the ballast on 3-phase and 208v (I think, though I always forget and read it off the ballast) you can blow this internal fuse. There is usually a spare at the bottom of the ballast.

With smaller HMIs there is still that fuse, but I am not really sure what it protects compared to the breaker.
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#14 Matty Wakai

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 10:13 PM

Any HMIs I've seen just have the ON/OFF switches that allow you to strike on the light head. I can't really see why you'd also need a "power" switch on the light head, since you already have a circuit breaker on the ballast.


could the extra switch also be a safety thing? say u've got a lamp operator closer to the lamphead than the ballast if something goes wrong?
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