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Eyemo Lens Mount Q's


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#1 Patrick Neary

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 06:52 PM

Hi--

I've been looking at snagging an Eyemo and having an adaptor made that would allow a stills lens (nikon/M42/etc) to slide into the "standard" eyemo mount (rather than hard-fronting just one camera) and now I see in a B&H manual that:

"Lens mounts for these cameras (single turret models) vary slightly from the mounts fitted to the other models in this series (referring, I guess, to the compact turret and spider turret models). The lenses therefore, are not interchangeable with lenses of other models. Lenses are similarly installed and locked in the single lens mount seat, and require an identical focusing procedure." blah blah blah

Any Eyemo owners out there who have run into this? what exactly are the differences in the two eyemo mounts?

And the second part of the question, any recommendations for a machinist/camera tech who could whip up a still-mount adaptor? It seems like it should be a simple job, and I'm not picky about which brand, I figure anything would be better than a 60-year-old, fungus-encrusted eymax!
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#2 David Venhaus

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 04:43 AM

I have run into something similar to this. I have used two different model K (the ones with a single lens mount) Eyemo's, one with a small round base and one with the larger squarish base. I tried four different lenses with them and only three worked on both. The only difference in the lens mounts is the metal prong that is inside the lens mount, that keeps the lens from turning when focusing. The only reason that the one lens won't fit is because the prong is further forward and the part of the lens that goes into the mount is longer, so it stops before being set in the proper place. I haven't tried those lenes on a turret-type Eyemo so I don't know if there is other issues with those beside what the manual says.
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#3 David Venhaus

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 05:20 AM

Looked it up in an Eyemo manual, the lenses that have the longer section that goes in the lens mount is called a Type "A" and ones that are shorter are Type "C". Type "A" is for model K (which isn't always true, as I mentioned in the above post) and Type "C" is for all other models.
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#4 Hal Smith

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 09:21 AM

And the second part of the question, any recommendations for a machinist/camera tech who could whip up a still-mount adaptor? It seems like it should be a simple job, and I'm not picky about which brand, I figure anything would be better than a 60-year-old, fungus-encrusted eymax!

See what Les Bosher in the UK says about an adapter. He's not cheap, but he's the man to go to for something unusual.
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#5 Patrick Neary

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 11:39 AM

thank you both for the info and recommendation.
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#6 chuck colburn

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 12:12 PM

Hi Patrick,

Perhaps one of these companies could provide what you nee

http://www.insyncpub...nies/repair.asp

Chuck
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#7 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 19 February 2007 - 01:24 AM

Hi Patrick,

Perhaps one of these companies could provide what you nee

http://www.insyncpub...nies/repair.asp

Chuck



I saw a Nikon to Eyemo mount adapter recently and I have pictures which I will post next week, I did not think it was possible but there it was....

-rob-
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#8 chuck colburn

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Posted 19 February 2007 - 01:54 AM

I saw a Nikon to Eyemo mount adapter recently and I have pictures which I will post next week, I did not think it was possible but there it was....

-rob-


Hi Robert,

If I remember right the Eyemo flange focal depth is 1.5" and Nikon is 1.830" so it would be easy enough to "Hard Front" the camera but a Nikon to Eyemo adapter might have some limitations on which Nikon lenses one could use. As the Nikon mount would have to be attached to a tube that would then slide into the camera mount. This might cause interference with some wider angle lens that protrude past the Nikon flange.

Chuck
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#9 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 19 February 2007 - 04:07 AM

Also might make for focusing issues because Nikon lenses are much heavier than Eyemo lenses.
Also remember that the focusing scales on photo lenses are far less precise and the Eyemo is of course a non-reflex camera.
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#10 chuck colburn

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Posted 19 February 2007 - 11:01 AM

Also might make for focusing issues because Nikon lenses are much heavier than Eyemo lenses.
Also remember that the focusing scales on photo lenses are far less precise and the Eyemo is of course a non-reflex camera.


Hey Dan,

Yep.
Although they did hang 100 and 150mm Miltars on them. Any longer lens should be supported. I've seen quite a few relexing jobs done to the camera over the years.

Chuck
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#11 Patrick Neary

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Posted 19 February 2007 - 12:03 PM

Hi again-

well I did hear back from Bernie O'Doherty, his opinion was that crafting such an adaptor might just be too much time and expense, which is what I expected, I guess. No sense spending a couple thousand on a $500 clockwork camera.

Personally, I would think an M42 mount would be the way to go, even thought the flange depth is about a mm less than nikon. I don't think one would have the problems with that little nikon aperture lever or elements that poke too far from the rear of the (stills) lens. I really just want a 35mm lens to work with, maybe a 20mm and 50 if it's a raging success.

I should be receiving a batch of old eyemo-mount lenses soon, hoping that I can pull one of the mounts off, and taking that and one of the nikon or M42 mounts I have here to a local machinist to see if they can combine the two while keeping the fine tolerances in check. I'm not about to give up just yet.

I've seen a thread or two here from folks attempting the same thing, but with no follow-up, so I will post back the eventual outcome, and maybe steps throughout the process for anyone else going on this same goose chase.
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#12 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 19 February 2007 - 12:10 PM

"Although they did hang 100 and 150mm Miltars on them. Any longer lens should be supported. I've seen quite a few relexing jobs done to the camera over the years."


The 100 and 150mm Miltars are not all that heavy compared to an 85mm 1.4 Nikkor.
In fact I have a quartzed, reflexed, Nikon mount Eyemo with a video tap.
It is also modified so that the digital tachometer works when the camera is handcranked.
The work was done by Steve's Cine Service in Vancouver.
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#13 Zachary Vex

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Posted 20 February 2007 - 04:27 PM

Somewhat off-topic, but one trick for focussing a turret (spider) Eyemo is to put identical lenses in the critical focus position and the taking position, and match the settings for focus. I have two 50mm lenses that I can use for this... one with a non-functioning aperture that I use on the focus side. At a distance, you can use this setup for framing as well. Close, of course, the parallax is frighteningly bad.
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#14 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 02:24 PM

Yep the parallax thing is a problem when close. There was a sliding plate that went on the tripod to shift the camera the same distance as between the viewing and the taking lens but these are hard to find.
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#15 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 04:15 PM

Yep the parallax thing is a problem when close. There was a sliding plate that went on the tripod to shift the camera the same distance as between the viewing and the taking lens but these are hard to find.



I think this is why the Eyemo falls into the category of "specialty" camera and not something to use where you need exact framing. I converted mine to a Nikon mount and basically have three lenses for it, a Peleng 8mm a Nikon 18mm and a Nikon 28mm. Great for a wide shot in a spot you cannot get to or a wide angle timelapse shot with a animation motor.

-Rob-
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#16 John Thomas

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 08:03 AM

I've been looking at snagging an Eyemo


Be sure to test that eyemo well before purchasing. I've been burned several times renting Eyemos for stunt work. Shoot tests on film before plunking down the dough.
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#17 Charlie Peich

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 08:38 AM

I think this is why the Eyemo falls into the category of "specialty" camera and not something to use where you need exact framing. I converted mine to a Nikon mount and basically have three lenses for it, a Peleng 8mm a Nikon 18mm and a Nikon 28mm. Great for a wide shot in a spot you cannot get to or a wide angle timelapse shot with a animation motor.

-Rob-


Rob,
Did you get the animation motor for your eyemo yet? I think you were looking at the motor from NCS Products.

Charlie
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#18 Patrick Neary

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 11:20 AM

Be sure to test that eyemo well before purchasing. I've been burned several times renting Eyemos for stunt work. Shoot tests on film before plunking down the dough.



Exactly. I've got a pile of test film waiting here for the right camera.

Fortunately this pursuit right now is more to satisfy the junkmeister/tinkerer in me than for a specific project. I did find this beast (see pic below, hopefully), and am awaiting its' arrival.



It was sold as a photo-sequence camera, but has an AC motor 12-48fps with a setting for 24fps and a mitchell mag, rather than B&H. Kind of defeats the purpose of the small, self-contained eyemo, but it was cheap, and if nothing else may have pieces I can use for another camera. Probably will hold books upright on the shelf very well too!

The saga continues.
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#19 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 01:49 PM

Looks likes it's good for the biceps when handheld.
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#20 Patrick Neary

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 02:07 PM

I was thinking maybe adding a 12v car battery to the base and using it as a "helmet cam" :)
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