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exposure for optical blow-up


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#1 Camila Freitas

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 12:44 PM

Hi

Is it necessary to compensate for exposure when you shoot S16 for an optical blow-up?

Thank you

Camila Freitas
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 12:59 PM

The exposure for the blow-up to a dupe element is a separate thing from the exposure for the original camera negative. Optical printer operators wedge test and determine the right exposure to create a new film element with the right density. Usually they are working with a color-timed, contact-printed 16mm IP so there is only an overall exposure for the reel (not scene-to-scene corrections) when making the 35mm dupe negative in an optical printer.

However...

A well-exposed, i.e. denser-than-normal, negative helps reduce grain and improve blacks, which makes for a better blow-up. Most people do this by rating the film stocks slower than normal, like by 1/3 or 2/3's of a stop (1/3 of a stop is farily negligible however -- 2/3's of a stop is better.)
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#3 Camila Freitas

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 01:26 PM

A well-exposed, i.e. denser-than-normal, negative helps reduce grain and improve blacks, which makes for a better blow-up. Most people do this by rating the film stocks slower than normal, like by 1/3 or 2/3's of a stop (1/3 of a stop is farily negligible however -- 2/3's of a stop is better.)[i]

Does that also apply to a s16-HD-35 blow-up?

What differences do you consider most important between the two routes?

Many thanks,

Camila
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 01:45 PM

A well-exposed, i.e. denser-than-normal, negative helps reduce grain and improve blacks, which makes for a better blow-up. Most people do this by rating the film stocks slower than normal, like by 1/3 or 2/3's of a stop (1/3 of a stop is farily negligible however -- 2/3's of a stop is better.)[i]

Does that also apply to a s16-HD-35 blow-up?

What differences do you consider most important between the two routes?

Many thanks,

Camila


Hi,

Slight overexposure is always a good thing, regardless of post route.

Stephen
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 04:28 PM

Yes, doing D.I.'s I've still found that a slightly denser-than-normal negative is better, although a little less critical than for direct printing and optical work.
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