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Shooting advice for 5279


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#1 Stephen Whitehead

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 10:58 AM

Hey, I am shooting 5279 on an upcoming project. Do you guys recomend exposing it for 400 ASA? also how does the latitude on that stock compare to the 5218?

Cheers,

Steve
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 02:00 PM

Hey, I am shooting 5279 on an upcoming project. Do you guys recomend exposing it for 400 ASA? also how does the latitude on that stock compare to the 5218?

Cheers,

Steve


A bit of overexposure will usually help with shadow detail, especially on an older film like 5279. 5218 has superior latitude, finer grain, and better shadow detail.
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#3 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 02:03 PM

The extra 1/3 stop of exposure can be a nice safety margin as far keeping a dense negative, however it is a fairly minor bit of overexposure, won't have much impact.

'79 does have less latitude than '18, especially in the shadow detail. I consider '79 to be a more contrasty stock as well as being a bit more saturated and warm.

It also can tend to get what I call "crunchy" in the blacks when faced with underexposure.

You may just want to shoot a simple test, if you have shot a lot of '18 then the differences will be pretty apparent.


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#4 Frank Barrera

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 10:38 PM

I have rated it at 400 and then opened another 1/2 stop for a nice fat negative. I love this stock for dramatic work. It's a shame it was discontinued in 16MM. If you are looking for a contrasty look this is your best option. But don't be fooled; although it has less latitude than 5218 it still has very good shadow detail. The colors are a bit removed from "reality". Color representation is a bit saturated. Certainly more so than 5218. And yet in this age of digital finishing I would imaging that you could probably telecine 79 to cut well with 18. Anyone out there try this?
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#5 Jarin Blaschke

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 11:38 PM

'79 is a good stock with some personality and snap, unlike the sanitized Vision2 stocks. Good blacks and saturation, at least when I exposed it at ei 320, back before it was discontinued. At that rating, shadows should have a good deal of information, sinking back to a good solid black. Technically not as much latitude as '18, but looks stronger as a film print to my tastes.
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 02:33 AM

I tend to agree with all the statements, especially the last. '79 had a "character" with richer-looking blacks and warmer colors. '18 has flatter shadows, more neutral colors, and of course finer grain.

400 is a good working ASA for '79. But don't worry about the shadows compared to '18; the detail is still there, just a little darker (and grainier). It holds shadows and highlights just fine. Rating at 320 or lower gives you pretty punchy colors.
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