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#1 marc barbé

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 08:57 PM

Hi,
The only info I have found is that the T* stands for a "multi-coating to prevent brilliance". My question is: is a Zeiss T* compatible with any other Zeiss prime of the same generation?
Marc.
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#2 Tim Carroll

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 10:13 PM

Hi,
The only info I have found is that the T* stands for a "multi-coating to prevent brilliance". My question is: is a Zeiss T* compatible with any other Zeiss prime of the same generation?
Marc.


The Zeiss lenses with the T* coating are superior lenses to the Zeiss lenses without the coating.

-Tim
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#3 Nathan Milford

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 11:40 PM

The Zeiss lenses with the T* coating are superior lenses to the Zeiss lenses without the coating.

-Tim


Unless you're like me and will sometimes buy lenses specifically without (or with single) coating because you like the look of them...

Ahhhh, subjectivity...
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#4 marc barbé

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 09:21 AM

The Zeiss lenses with the T* coating are superior lenses to the Zeiss lenses without the coating.

-Tim


More specifically, I was wondering about using zeiss primes with a zeiss T zoom, or' cooke primes for daylight (100 asa) with a zeiss T zoom for nights (25O asa).
Marc.
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#5 Tim Carroll

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 09:35 AM

More specifically, I was wondering about using zeiss primes with a zeiss T zoom, or' cooke primes for daylight (100 asa) with a zeiss T zoom for nights (25O asa).
Marc.


Marc,

It is always best to test the lenses you want to use together. I do alot of that and it's unbelievable how two lenses of the same "type" can look so different. Especially older lenses, as coatings age and yellow, or separate.

Depending on the age of the lens (and if you are talking pre-T* Zeiss lenses you are talking decades), and how the lens has been used and stored, the image could be pretty variable. Again, best to test the individual lenses you want to use on the project to see how they look when compared to each other.

If you are planning on taking your footage and having it telecined, then the colorist can alter the color of the image quite a bit in transfer and make the lenses match better, but he/she can do nothing about lens flare or lens sharpness. Again, always best to test.

-Tim
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#6 marc barbé

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 10:07 AM

Marc,

It is always best to test the lenses you want to use together. I do alot of that and it's unbelievable how two lenses of the same "type" can look so different. Especially older lenses, as coatings age and yellow, or separate.

Depending on the age of the lens (and if you are talking pre-T* Zeiss lenses you are talking decades), and how the lens has been used and stored, the image could be pretty variable. Again, best to test the individual lenses you want to use on the project to see how they look when compared to each other.

If you are planning on taking your footage and having it telecined, then the colorist can alter the color of the image quite a bit in transfer and make the lenses match better, but he/she can do nothing about lens flare or lens sharpness. Again, always best to test.

-Tim


Thank you, Tim. I'm working in S16 to be blown up 35. I do intend to test the lenses thoroughly; I was just wondering if trying to put those types of lenses together made sense at all.
Regards,
Marc.
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#7 Dan Goulder

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 10:07 AM

Well maintained older Zeiss standard mount lenses are still capable of rendering a good quality image, even by the standards of today. Besides, you can put together a whole set for less than the price of one used PL-mounted "T-coated" Zeiss.
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#8 Tim Carroll

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 10:46 AM

Thank you, Tim. I'm working in S16 to be blown up 35. I do intend to test the lenses thoroughly; I was just wondering if trying to put those types of lenses together made sense at all.
Regards,
Marc.



Marc,

I think you will have better luck, with lenses that age, to try to keep your lens selection down to variations within the same manufacturer, as in Zeiss with T* coating and Zeiss without the coating, or Cooke Kinetals and Cooke Speed Panchros, or different Angenieux lenses, etc.

I've had difficulty matching the look of older Cooke lenses with the look of older Zeiss lenses, with the look of older Angenieux lenses, with the look of older Schneider lenses.

You can see how a variety of older lenses look when shooting the same scene on this web site:
Older Cooke, Zeiss, Angenieux and Schneider lens tests

Again, best to test, test, test.

-Tim
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#9 marc barbé

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 11:16 AM

Marc,

I think you will have better luck, with lenses that age, to try to keep your lens selection down to variations within the same manufacturer, as in Zeiss with T* coating and Zeiss without the coating, or Cooke Kinetals and Cooke Speed Panchros, or different Angenieux lenses, etc.

I've had difficulty matching the look of older Cooke lenses with the look of older Zeiss lenses, with the look of older Angenieux lenses, with the look of older Schneider lenses.

You can see how a variety of older lenses look when shooting the same scene on this web site:
Older Cooke, Zeiss, Angenieux and Schneider lens tests

Again, best to test, test, test.

-Tim


Thank you for this helpfull advice, Tim.
Marc.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Metropolis Post

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Glidecam

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Aerial Filmworks

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Wooden Camera

Opal

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