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Time exposure cameras (Autom-B etc)


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#1 jacob thomas

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Posted 25 February 2007 - 06:34 PM

I'm looking to pick up a time exposure camera, so far I've found three series of camera which do it, I'm just wondering about the differences in the way they work.

What are the differences between the nizo's Autom-B and the time exposure settings that the Bauer Royal and A5XX series have and the Eumig and Bolex cameras have?

I'd love to hear about the Bauer and Eumig/Bolex cameras especially as it is normally the Nizos which are discussed (is this because they are better in some way?).
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#2 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 09:33 PM

I'm looking to pick up a time exposure camera, so far I've found three series of camera which do it, I'm just wondering about the differences in the way they work.

What are the differences between the nizo's Autom-B and the time exposure settings that the Bauer Royal and A5XX series have and the Eumig and Bolex cameras have?

I'd love to hear about the Bauer and Eumig/Bolex cameras especially as it is normally the Nizos which are discussed (is this because they are better in some way?).


Eumig uses a light sensor under the lens but the light sensor reacts to the lens zooming in or out as well. Because the light sensor is plainly visible, it can be manipulated in a couple of ways. One way is with black electricians tape, simply cover a certain percentage of the light sensor as way to combat direct light that can hit the sensor as car head lights move by. By covering a portion of the sensor one can even out the increments somewhat, yet the change in increments can add it's own entirely unique dimension.

Another method is to completely cover the light sensor but within the cover, place an a variable L.E.D. By varying the intensity of the L.E.D., you can control the exposure time of each frame and also keep them uniform in length. This is useful because first one can get an "automatic" reading by keeping the light sensor exposed, then one can cover the sensor manual for completely controlling the exposure duration.

I usually set the f-stop between f2.0-2.8 to f4.0 which helps minimize light flares plus seems to sharpen up the picture. The Bauer uses a "Delorean" style of light sensor which is pulled out via a hinge, at which point it behaves very similarly to the Eumig.

All in all, the Nizo and the Eumig both have their usefulness, I tend to like the Eumigs, perhaps because everything runs off of 1.5 volt double AA batteries.
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Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

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