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Guillermo Navarro's "Pans Labyrinth" Won the Oscar


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#1 Juan Guajardo

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Posted 25 February 2007 - 10:21 PM

I was not vaiting for it but i have nothing more to say that thaks Guillermo for puting the latin cinematography so up.
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#2 Sam Kim

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Posted 25 February 2007 - 10:26 PM

well deserved, but i was hoping Children of Men, Emmanuel Lubezki, would win. BUT still well deserved.
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#3 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 12:49 AM

I've never been a huge fan of his work and I do feel this year should have definitely been Lubezki's. He was snubbed years before when Sleepy Hollow lost out as well. I'm a bit disappointed I must say - Lubezki is perhaps the most talented DP to come along in years and his body of work is flawless.
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#4 J Lund

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 01:12 AM

After reading the article in American Cinematographer and seeing The Black Dahlia on the big screen, I definately was routing for the veteran Zsigmond. It is such a beautiful display of 21st century noir cinematography while employing some of the most incredible crane work almost unending through vast sets. This is just such a classically beautifully shot film and I was honestly disappointed that Vilmos didn't walk off with an Oscar. Oh well, at least I was satisfied with Bebe's accomplishment with last years Geisha.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 01:33 AM

When someone wins an award in your own professional field, it's probably best in a public forum to just congratulate them, rather then imply that someone else should have won.

You never know when you'll be shaking the winner's hand at some event...

Besides, it's the Oscars... we all know that it's nice to be nominated, even nicer to win... but it doesn't necessarily mean that one thing was better than another, it's not an accurate measurement of quality. I try to not take these award shows too seriously.

Ultmately, though Lubezk didn't win, I don't think he or anyone else really thinks therefore he isn't quite as good as the winner, nor does Navarro think that -- Lubezki's career is on a roll, he is well-respected by everyone, etc.

Besides, "Pan's Labyrinth" also won the award at the Cameraimage festival in Poland so it certainly was a close race in terms of what would win -- it wasn't unexpected, it's not undeserving of praise.

At this level of filmmaking, it becomes silly to compare these nominees too closely and pick one as being better than the other.

Speaking of "Sleepy Hollow", look at that year for Oscar nominations for Best Cinematography:

WINNER: American Beauty - Conrad L. Hall
Other Nominees:
The End of the Affair - Roger Pratt
The Insider - Dante Spinotti
Sleepy Hollow - Emmanuel Lubezki
Snow Falling on Cedars - Robert Richardson

I mean, it's silly to even compare a contempory movie like "American Beauty" to a storybook fantasy like "Sleepy Hollow" (which ironically enough, opens with a scene shot by Conrad Hall as a pick-up.) In the long run, I have probably ended up studying more how "The Insider" and "Snow Falling on Cedars" was shot because of the types of movies I was shooting.

Personally, I would have voted for either "Sleepy Hollow" or "Snow Falling on Cedars" (probably the second) but that doesn't mean I think they are "better" than the other nominees, or that the winner was less deserving, just that I responded more personally to them because they coincided with my own tastes. When you think about it, in many ways, Conrad Hall had the hardest job of the group because he was dealing with some ordinary tract home sets on a movie backlot, a mundane setting -- not amazing winter locations or incredible period art direction.

Now we have the reverse situation here, and the more typical one for the Oscars, that the fantasy movie with stylized production design wins the cinematography award over the one shot in more ordinary locations in mostly natural light. Again, the two projects are just too dissimilar to even compare so I didn't bother to form a strong opinion about which should win. I sort of stop short at just thinking about who should get nominated. The notion that a single film's cinematography can be measurably better than every other movie's, well, it's hard for me to swallow. At some point, the comparisons just break down. Even the two Victorian-age magician movies nominated had a lot of dissimilar qualities and artistic goals.

As I posted before, I probably liked "The Prestige" the most this year for its cinematography (though at the time, I hadn't seen "The Illusionist" or "Pan's Labyrinth" yet, but now that I have, I'm still sticking to my original thoughts) but I'm not going to argue with someone who prefers a different choice anymore than I'm going to get into an argument as to whether pork is better than beef. "The Prestige" just falls in line more closely to my own tastes in regards to cinematography, and my tastes in movies.
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#6 Jan Weis

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 02:12 AM

''I was not vaiting for it but i have nothing more to say that thaks Guillermo for puting the latin cinematography so up.''

I'm sorry but since when does best cinematography have anything to do with nationalities?

/Jan
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#7 Alex Lindblom

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 05:10 AM

Great work and big congratulation's to Guillermo Navarro for picking up the Oscar. It was well deserved.

But I have to agree with David, my personal favorite as well this year was the Prestige.

It was also of course nice to finally see Martin Scorsese, get his Oscar at last.


Alex
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#8 Keith Mottram

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 06:45 AM

It was also of course nice to finally see Martin Scorsese, get his Oscar at last.
Alex


nice, but trivialises this increasingly trivial award ceremony further... greengrass was robbed.
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 08:39 AM

I suppose I'm experiencing a cultural disconnect sometimes here on the web -- when some DP says about anothers' work "I've never been impressed by so-and-so" it comes off to me as cocky and cruel (I don't want to read someone saying the same thing about my entire ouvre...), but for all I know, in other parts of the world, blunt honesty of opinion is valued more and a cutting remark is always forgiven by fellow professionals. Sometimes I even feel that cultural difference between the West Coast and the East Coast, not just between the U.S. and Europe. Maybe our warm weather makes us more mellow, I don't know, or maybe it's the Japanese part of me.
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#10 John Holland

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 11:03 AM

I think it must be the warm weather .
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#11 John Sprung

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 11:14 AM

The problem with the Oscars is that there are so few of them, and so much equally excellent work. So, it almost becomes a throw of the dice. Over time, this results in another phenomenon, giving an Oscar to someone who's done a lot of great work in a long career, just because they've deserved it many times before, and not won.



-- J.S.
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#12 Sam Kim

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 11:34 AM

After reading the article in American Cinematographer and seeing The Black Dahlia on the big screen, I definately was routing for the veteran Zsigmond. It is such a beautiful display of 21st century noir cinematography while employing some of the most incredible crane work almost unending through vast sets. This is just such a classically beautifully shot film and I was honestly disappointed that Vilmos didn't walk off with an Oscar. Oh well, at least I was satisfied with Bebe's accomplishment with last years Geisha.


geisha was awesome! agree with you on that for sure!

When someone wins an award in your own professional field, it's probably best in a public forum to just congratulate them, rather then imply that someone else should have won.



that was a slap. haha. very well put sir.

You are part ASIAN! haha. Every time i look at your photo i think that but no info anywhere ever suggested it, so i always thought you were one of those guys who just looked the part! =]

Have you always lived in LA?

Maybe our warm weather makes us more mellow, I don't know, or maybe it's the Japanese part of me.


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#13 Ken Cangi

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 12:41 PM

Sometimes I even feel that cultural difference between the West Coast and the East Coast, not just between the U.S. and Europe. Maybe our warm weather makes us more mellow, I don't know, or maybe it's the Japanese part of me.

This is an interesting comment to me, because I am originally from Boston. I've been out west for almost seventeen years, and I still occasionally struggle with the political correctness dichotomy. Although I have come to appreciate the so-called laid-back attitude, I still ultimately prefer blunt honesty. I find it more productive in the sense that it enables me to better understand where I actually stand in a given situation. I also find the alternative style to be patronizing and an insult to my intelligence when applied to professional criticism.

My life pursuits are generally very important to me, and achieving the best from myself has always been less complicated when I have had a clear understanding of my actual progress and, more importantly, shortcomings. Cold, hard, honest input from professional peers is one of the best ways to achieve such an understanding about one's progress.

As for film awards, they are what they are, and most of the process is based on personal taste. If I understood you correctly, I agree that comparing dissimilar films is like comparing apples to oranges. It is a dead-end exercise. They are both fruit, just as cars and spaceships are both transportation vehicles, although the similarities basically end there.

Edited by Ken Cangi, 26 February 2007 - 12:45 PM.

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#14 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 01:05 PM

I suppose I'm experiencing a cultural disconnect sometimes here on the web -- when some DP says about anothers' work "I've never been impressed by so-and-so" it comes off to me as cocky and cruel (I don't want to read someone saying the same thing about my entire ouvre...), but for all I know, in other parts of the world, blunt honesty of opinion is valued more and a cutting remark is always forgiven by fellow professionals. Sometimes I even feel that cultural difference between the West Coast and the East Coast, not just between the U.S. and Europe. Maybe our warm weather makes us more mellow, I don't know, or maybe it's the Japanese part of me.


I feel this one was aimed at me, David. I obviously wasn't out to be cruel or cocky in any way, it's just that my post reflected my personal taste, that's all. Doesn't mean he's not good, not worthy or anything of that sort. I think he's a solid DP, just not lighting to my personal taste. I can say the same thing about Ballhaus and many others (but I mostly refrain from it). This is a forum, public yes, but would you rather have it filled with kiss-asses that will only give out oily praise? Me I'd rather hear it from the ones who don't.

I wouldn't call you mellower at all - in fact, you've lost your cool in here a lot more times than I have.
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#15 John Holland

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 01:13 PM

Just think [ as far as i am concerned ] the wrong mexican cinematographer won .
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#16 Jan Weis

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 01:34 PM

Just think [ as far as i am concerned ] the wrong mexican cinematographer won .


Can I agree and disagree?

Navarro obviously deserved an oscar for the cinematography, it did look fanstastic but Lubezki used his own unique style that is so incredibaly different from what I have seen in the past few years (it definately puts Babel to shame) and right now I suppose different is better... On the plus side we probably wont see a over-use of Lubezki style in the cinema in the near future.

my 2 cents

congrats to Navarro!

/Jan
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#17 Richard Boddington

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 02:46 PM

''I was not vaiting for it but i have nothing more to say that thaks Guillermo for puting the latin cinematography so up.''

I'm sorry but since when does best cinematography have anything to do with nationalities?

/Jan


Yes I've noticed over the last few years any time a non English speaking white male wins an Oscar it's some sort of big deal. It's like, "Yeah, we finally stuck it to the man who was keeping us down."

All the nation pumping BS has to go. The producer of the Departed won for best picture but he wasn't jumping up and down saying, "I'm from the UK, three cheers for the UK, I beat the Americans."

Last year Paul Haggis from Canada won and didn't get into any, "Oh at last we poor oppressed Canadians have triumphed."

On a side note, I have never understood why the Academy allows foreigngers to win the Oscars any way. It's a US competition, why allow non Americans in? All Canadian film, TV, and music, awards are closed to Americans, so why allow Canadians to participate in American awards? :blink:

R,
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#18 Juan Guajardo

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 02:57 PM

''I was not vaiting for it but i have nothing more to say that thaks Guillermo for puting the latin cinematography so up.''

I'm sorry but since when does best cinematography have anything to do with nationalities?

/Jan


Not at all, but is good news to knows that latin filmakers can do it too, is just that maybe he is the first latin DP with a great carrier recognized for all over the world thanks to the academy

Edited by Juan Guajardo, 26 February 2007 - 02:59 PM.

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#19 Jon-Hebert Barto

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 03:42 PM

On a side note, I have never understood why the Academy allows foreigngers to win the Oscars any way. It's a US competition, why allow non Americans in? All Canadian film, TV, and music, awards are closed to Americans, so why allow Canadians to participate in American awards? :blink:

R,


If an American-born directed a Canadian financed film would he not be eligible? Just curious...

The acadamy has zero credit with me anyway. It is truely a sweepstakes based on political jury-mandering, but then again, every award ceremony is, thats why competative awards have no place in a self described artistic field. It's just stupid. er, IMHO.

....the science awards are cool, though. I guess I'll have to take back my "zero credit" stance. Why not show them in prime time? Oh, no botox or borrowed jewelry.

Poo-poo on the red carpet...

hehe-Jonnie
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#20 Richard Boddington

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 04:12 PM

If an American-born directed a Canadian financed film would he not be eligible? Just curious...


Nope. If he's an American citizen, no go.

This issue keeps coming up as American actors appear in Canadian features, but are then banned from winning the Canadian "academy award" called the.....the.....the.....dang I can't think of it. Do a Google search.

The awards show was watched by 18 Canadians last year, up from 13 the previous year.

R,
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