Jump to content


Photo

Blood on Black


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 James Erd

James Erd
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 187 posts
  • Director
  • Palo Alto, CA

Posted 27 February 2007 - 07:47 PM

So I finally got the opportunity to set up a blood gag, but out actor was wearing black and the scene was lit a bit on the darkside. Also there was a lot of smoke in the scene. We tried to light the scene so the camera would pick up the shine. Still have to wait an see how that came out.

It looks like there is going to be a sequel and the bad guys tend to wear black and tend to get shot, so I'm sure to encounter the same problem in the future. If any one knows or has ideas on how to make red blood read on black fabric I'd love to hear from you.

Also we were using a blood cannon to paint the wall behind the actor. Very cool. Only we were concerned about cleanup as we needed to do leave our location in its original condition. So we covered the wall with white muslin to protect the paint from our wonderfully gory blood. The problem with muslin is once the blood hits it then its hard to clean for the next shot. In the future I was thinking of pretreating the muslin or possibly even the wall with a resist such as Scotch-guard. Has any one tried this or if you know another way... thoughts or ideas welcome.

Thanks
  • 0

#2 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 28 February 2007 - 03:57 AM

I'd probably use bright red water-based paint, as you said, Scotch-guard the fabric and have a washtub of soap and water, a scrub brush, rinse water and towels with a blow-dryer standing by to immediately wash the paint out of the coat as soon as cut is called out.
  • 0

#3 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19765 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 28 February 2007 - 11:04 AM

Blood is translucent and needs to be backlit or on a white surface for the color to be seen. Otherwise, your only recourse is to make a fake blood that is more opaque, closer to paint, as James suggested. Only question is how sticky & viscous you want it to be.
  • 0

#4 James Erd

James Erd
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 187 posts
  • Director
  • Palo Alto, CA

Posted 28 February 2007 - 03:07 PM

Great suggestions. I thinking about using Tempera paint for opacity and non-sudsing soap or even gel for translucence and gloss. So that's all non-toxic and water based which makes every one happy. The soap should make clean up even easier. All I have to do is add water and some rags and were good to go.

I have some industrial tints which I can use to adjust the color where I want it. The tint is not quite as nontoxic as the tempera but it doesn't take very much of it to have a huge effect. Then again it is the most likely to cause a stain.

I'm hoping we can dispense with the muslin altogether as it is time consuming to put up, and one more thing to strike at 3 a.m. on the last day of shooting. I'm going to test the scotch-guard on a bare white wall and see if that is enough.
  • 0

#5 Keneu Luca

Keneu Luca
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 440 posts
  • Other

Posted 28 February 2007 - 03:22 PM

Maybe I don't fully understand the situation.

But if the character is getting shot or stabbed, in other words, it is clearly established to the audience that there is a serious wound, of course the liquid that comes out of the character is blood. Do you really need to emphasize the color? Do you really need to hit the audience over the head? Are you afraid that the audience might get confused and think that it is water coming out of the character's body?
  • 0

#6 James Erd

James Erd
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 187 posts
  • Director
  • Palo Alto, CA

Posted 28 February 2007 - 03:56 PM

Well actually the character gets shot more than once. Once by small caliber from underneath the table. So there will be a sound effect, then cut a close up of the wound and the camera dollies back to reveal a weapon in the other characters hand. So it's important for the wound to read which is a problem because the character is wearing black.

Then the guy gets shot again. This time its a chest wound. The blood cannon was aimed at a window which was nicely backlight. So that worked out very well, but again we wanted to show an entrance wound. That part of the effect almost got dropped from the scene because we didn't think it would read on film, but since we already had the actor rigged.... we went for it.

Thinking about it now I would ask that the actor grab the wound so the blood could run over his fingers.... eh but we'd been shooting from a.m to a.m. :blink: :blink: :blink:
  • 0


Abel Cine

Tai Audio

The Slider

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

CineTape

Glidecam

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine